• Biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) using [¹⁸F]-IL1RA and PET imaging in rats.

      Cawthorne, Christopher; Prenant, C; Smigova, A; Julyan, Peter J; Maroy, R; Herholz, K; Rothwell, N; Boutin, H; Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. (2011-02)
      Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to improve our understanding of the preclinical pharmacokinetics and metabolism of therapeutic agents, and is easily translated to clinical studies in humans. However, studies involving proteins radiolabelled with clinically relevant PET isotopes are currently limited. Here we illustrate the potential of PET imaging in a preclinical study of the biodistribution and metabolism of ¹⁸F-labelled IL-1 receptor antagonist ([¹⁸F]IL-1RA) using a novel [¹⁸F]-radiolabelling technique.
    • Radiolabeling with fluorine-18 of a protein, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

      Prenant, C; Cawthorne, Christopher; Fairclough, M; Rothwell, N; Boutin, H; Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. cprenant@cyclopharma.fr (2010-09)
      IL-1RA is a naturally occurring antagonist of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) with high therapeutic promise, but its pharmacokinetic remains poorly documented. In this report, we describe the radiolabeling of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1RA) with fluorine-18 to allow pharmacokinetic studies by positron emission tomography (PET). rhIL-1RA was labeled randomly by reductive alkylation of free amino groups (the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues or amino-terminal residues) using [(18)F]fluoroacetaldehyde under mild reaction conditions. Radiosyntheses used a remotely controlled experimental rig within 100min and the radiochemical yield was in the range 7.1-24.2% (decay corrected, based on seventeen syntheses). We showed that the produced [(18)F]fluoroethyl-rhIL-1ra retained binding specificity by conducting an assay on rat brain sections, allowing its pharmakokinetic study using PET.