• Histological outcome of delayed orchidectomy after primary chemotherapy for metastatic germ cell tumour of the testis.

      Ramani, Vijay A C; Grey, Benjamin R; Addla, Sanjai K; Dunham, Mark P; Sangar, Vijay K; Clarke, Noel W; Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. (2008-04)
      AIMS: To identify the incidence of viable local tumour in the testis of patients undergoing delayed orchidectomy after initial presentation with advanced germ cell tumour (GCT) treated by primary chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty-three patients presenting with advanced metastatic GCT were reviewed. The median age at presentation was 34 years. All received chemotherapy without previous orchidectomy. The decision to initiate chemotherapy without orchidectomy was based on a heavy tumour load and the patient's condition at initial presentation. A histological diagnosis was available from a biopsy of metastases in 23 patients; treatment in the remaining 10 patients was initiated after diagnosis based on a combination of elevated serum tumour markers, testicular findings and the presence of a retroperitoneal mass. RESULTS: Seminomatous GCT (SGCT) was diagnosed in 13 patients, non-seminomatous GCT (NSGCT) in 17 patients and mixed GCT (MGCT) in the remaining three patients. Bleomycin/etoposide/cisplatin-based chemotherapy was the principle regimen. After initial chemotherapy, all patients with pure SGCT had only scar tissue in the orchidectomy specimen, with no residual tumour. Nine of 17 patients (52.9%) with NSGCT had viable tumour remaining in the orchidectomy specimen. All three cases of MGCT had persistent viable invasive seminoma. Twenty-seven patients (81.8%) were recurrence free and alive after a median of 49 months of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Thirty-six per cent of patients had residual tumour locally in the testis after primary chemotherapy for metastatic GCT of the testis. However, in the cases with pure seminomatous disease, there was no residual tumour present. It may not be necessary to undertake delayed orchidectomy in these patients.
    • Imaging in primary penile cancer: current status and future directions.

      Kochhar, Rohit; Taylor, Benjamin; Sangar, Vijay K; Department of Radiology, The Christie, NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. rohit.kochhar@christie.nhs.uk (2010-01)
      Penile cancer is a rare neoplasm in the developed world. Clinical assessment often results in inaccurate staging and radiological techniques have a key role in staging and postoperative assessment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depicts penile anatomy in detail and is the most accurate technique for local staging and postoperative follow-up. MRI and ultrasound (US), although helpful for assessment of lymph nodes, are not reliable enough for accurate nodal staging. US-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), however, remains a valuable tool to confirm metastases in suspicious inguinal nodes. Lymphoscintigraphy with dynamic sentinel node biopsy (DSNB) is a promising technique used to predict occult lymph node metastases. Novel imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT) and nanoparticle enhanced MRI have high sensitivity and specificity for lymph node metastases but their availability is limited and clinical utility is not fully established. The radiologist needs to be familiar with the normal penile anatomy, imaging appearances of pre- and post-treatment penile cancer, and the advantages and limitations of the available imaging techniques. This review highlights the above points and presents a systematic approach to make the best use of imaging in the management of patients with penile cancer.