• Discrimination of prostate cancer cells and non-malignant cells using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

      Baker, Matthew J; Brown, Michael D; Gazi, Ehsan; Clarke, Noel W; Vickerman, John C; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, Centre for Instrumentation and Analytical Science, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, UK. M.Baker-2@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk (2008-02)
      This communication utilises Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) combined with multivariate analysis to obtain spectra from the surfaces of three closely related cell lines allowing their discrimination based upon mass spectral ions.
    • FTIR-based spectroscopic analysis in the identification of clinically aggressive prostate cancer.

      Baker, Matthew J; Gazi, Ehsan; Brown, Michael D; Shanks, Jonathan H; Gardner, Peter; Clarke, Noel W; Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, Centre for Instrumentation and Analytical Science, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M1 7DN, UK. M.J.Baker@manchester.ac.uk (2008-12-02)
      Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that uses infrared radiation to vibrate molecular bonds within the sample that absorbs it. As different samples contain different molecular bonds or different configurations of molecular bonds, FTIR allows us to obtain chemical information on molecules within the sample. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy in conjunction with a principal component-discriminant function analysis (PC-DFA) algorithm was applied to the grading of prostate cancer (CaP) tissue specimens. The PC-DFA algorithm is used alongside the established diagnostic measures of Gleason grading and the tumour/node/metastasis system. Principal component-discriminant function analysis improved the sensitivity and specificity of a three-band Gleason score criterion diagnosis previously reported by attaining an overall sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 99.4%. For the first time, we present the use of a two-band criterion showing an association of FTIR-based spectral characteristics with clinically aggressive behaviour in CaP manifest as local and/or distal spread. This paper shows the potential for the use of spectroscopic analysis for the evaluation of the biopotential of CaP in an accurate and reproducible manner.
    • Investigating FTIR based histopathology for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

      Baker, Matthew J; Gazi, Ehsan; Brown, Michael D; Shanks, Jonathan H; Clarke, Noel W; Gardner, Peter; Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, Centre for Instrumentation and Analytical Science, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science, The University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester, UK. (2009-02)
      Prostate cancer is the most common gender specific cancer. The current gold standard for diagnosis, histopathology, is subjective and limited by variation between different pathologists. The diagnostic problems associated with the correct grading and staging of prostate cancer (CaP) has led to an interest in the development of spectroscopic based diagnostic techniques. FTIR microspectroscopy used in combination with a Principal Component Discriminant Function Analysis (PC-DFA) was applied to investigate FTIR based histopathology for the diagnosis of CaP. In this paper we report the results of a large patient study in which FTIR has been proven to grade CaP tissue specimens to a high degree of sensitivity and specificity.