• Alternating irinotecan with oxaliplatin combined with UFT plus leucovorin (SCOUT) in metastatic colorectal cancer.

      Sheikh, Hamid Y; Valle, Juan W; Waddell, Thomas K; Palmer, Karen; Wilson, Gregory; Sjursen, Ann-Marie; Craven, Olive; Swindell, Ric; Saunders, Mark P; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. (2008-08-19)
      Tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus leucovorin (LV, folinic acid) with alternating irinotecan and oxaliplatin were effective and well tolerated in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in a phase I study. This study expanded the maximum tolerated dose group. Patients aged >or=18 years had histologically confirmed, inoperable, previously untreated, measurable mCRC. Patients received irinotecan 180 mg m(-2) on day 1, oxaliplatin 100 mg m(-2) on day 15 and UFT 250 mg m(-2) plus LV 90 mg on days 1-21 every 28 days. The phase I/II study comprised 45 patients, 29 at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The response rate in 38 evaluable patients was 63% (95% confidence interval (CI): 49-80). Median time to progression and overall survival were 8.7 months (95% CI: 7.9-10.4) and 16.8 months (95% CI: 9.6-25.3), respectively. In the MTD group, one patient had grade 3 leucopenia; one had grade 3 neutropaenia; three had grade 3 diarrhoea; and one had grade 3 neurotoxicity. No hand-foot syndrome grade >1 was seen. In total, 67% of eligible patients received second-line therapy. UFT plus LV with alternating irinotecan and oxaliplatin is an efficacious first-line treatment for mCRC, with minimal neurotoxicity and hand-foot syndrome.
    • A multicentre study of capecitabine, oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab as perioperative treatment of patients with poor-risk colorectal liver-only metastases not selected for upfront resection.

      Wong, R; Cunningham, D; Barbachano, Y; Saffery, C; Valle, Juan W; Hickish, T; Mudan, S; Brown, G; Khan, A; Wotherspoon, A; et al. (2011-09)
      Perioperative chemotherapy improves outcome in resectable colorectal liver-only metastasis (CLM). This study aimed to evaluate perioperative CAPOX (capecitabine-oxaliplatin) plus bevacizumab in patients with poor-risk CLM not selected for upfront resection.
    • A patient with a metastatic gastroenteropancreatic endocrine carcinoma causing hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia and the carcinoid syndrome.

      Hinchliffe, E; Allcock, R L; Mansoor, Was; Myers, M A; Department of Clinical Biochemistry, University Hospital of South Manchester, Wythenshawe, Manchester M23 9LT, UK. (2011-11)
      We present the case of a 57-year-old patient who initially presented with a constellation of symptoms including intense pruritis, flushing and diarrhoea. Following several months clinical deterioration, the patient was investigated radiologically, where multiple hepatic tumours were identified. Liver biopsy confirmed the presence of a well-differentiated metastatic gastroenteropancreatic endocrine carcinoma with biochemical evidence of serotonin secretion. Over a period of six months, the clinical course of the patient's disease progressed whereby severe hypoglycaemia became the major manifestation. Subsequent biochemical investigations confirmed the diagnosis of an insulinoma. Extensive radiological investigation revealed a solitary primary pancreatic tumour, indicating the presence of a metastatic pancreatic endocrine tumour (PET) secreting both insulin and serotonin. The patient was treated with a chemotherapy regimen consisting of 12 cycles of 5-fluorouracil/oxaliplatin, responding clinically - improved World Health Organization performance score from 3 to 1, biochemically - significantly reduced plasma chromogranin A and cancer antigen 19-9 concentrations and improved liver function tests, and radiologically - reduced pancreatic and hepatic tumour size. This is the first report of a primary PET secreting insulin and serotonin. Due to the association of serotonin-secreting gastroenteropancreatic endocrine tumours (GEP-ETs) with multiple endocrine neoplasia type-1 (MEN1) and biochemical evidence of an insulinoma, MEN1 should also be considered in such cases. The case provides further evidence for the biological heterogeneity of GEP-ETs and the myriad secretory humoral products and resultant clinical syndromes arising from such tumours.
    • A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of OSI-7904L, a liposomal thymidylate synthase inhibitor in combination with oxaliplatin in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

      Clamp, Andrew R; Schöffski, Patrick; Valle, Juan W; Wilson, R; Marreaud, Sandrine; Govaerts, A-S; Debois, M; Lacombe, D; Twelves, C; Chick, J; et al. (2008-04)
      PURPOSE: OSI-7904L is a liposomal formulation of a potent thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor. This phase I study evaluated the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of OSI-7904L administered in combination with oxaliplatin every 21 days in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. METHOD: A 3+3 study design was utilized at predefined dose levels. Polymorphisms in the TS enhancer region and XPD enzyme were investigated as potential predictors of efficacy and toxicity. RESULTS: Fourteen patients received 76 cycles of treatment. At the highest dose level (OSI-7904L 9 mg/m(2), oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2)) investigated, one of nine patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity of grade 3 oral mucositis with cycle 1 and five further patients required dose reductions. The toxicity profile of stomatitis, diarrhea, nausea, fatigue, sensory neuropathy and skin rash was consistent with that expected for a TS inhibitor/oxaliplatin combination regimen. PK analysis showed high interpatient variability with no detectable interaction between OSI-7904L and oxaliplatin. Partial radiological responses were documented in two patients. CONCLUSIONS: The recommended regimen for further investigation is OSI-7904L 9 mg/m(2) and oxaliplatin 130 mg/m(2).
    • Phase II trial of combretastatin A4 phosphate, carboplatin, and paclitaxel in patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

      Zweifel, M; Jayson, Gordon C; Reed, N S; Osborne, R; Hassan, B; Ledermann, J; Shreeves, G; Poupard, L; Lu, S-P; Balkissoon, J; et al. (2011-09)
      A previous dose-escalation trial of the vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A4 phosphate (CA4P) given before carboplatin, paclitaxel, or both showed responses in 7 of 18 patients with relapsed ovarian cancer.
    • Understanding chemotherapy treatment pathways of advanced colorectal cancer patients to inform an economic evaluation in the United Kingdom.

      Shabaruddin, F H; Elliott, R A; Valle, Juan W; Newman, W G; Payne, K; Health Sciences - Economics, School of Community Based Medicine, The University of Manchester, 1st Floor, Jean McFarlane Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. (2010-07-27)
      BACKGROUND: Accurate description of current practice within advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) specialties were needed to inform an economic evaluation of the UGT1A1 pharmacogenetic test for irinotecan in the United Kingdom. METHODS: The study was based on a literature review and elicitation of expert opinion. The expert panel comprised 44 consultant oncologists in NHS Hospital Trusts across England. RESULTS: Ten first-line, 10 second-line and 12 third-line chemotherapy regimens were reported, reflecting wide variations in treatment pathways. Predominant pathways emerged with: first-line treatment with oxaliplatin-based regimens, second-line treatment with irinotecan-based regimens and third-line treatment with mitomycin-based regimens. Experts estimated the frequency of febrile neutropaenia 8.4% (95% CI: 6.7-10.0), septic neutropaenia 4.7% (95% CI: 3.4-6.0) and severe diarrhoea 13.1% (95% CI: 10.8-15.5). Approaches for the clinical management of neutropaenia within the NHS were described. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified wide variations in the clinical management of advanced CRC patients. Descriptions of current treatment pathways are necessary for economic evaluations. Variations in clinical practice must be reflected in the model to ensure the findings from an economic evaluation of UGT1A1 testing are sufficient to inform policy regarding the cost-effective use of NHS resources.