• Consolidation radiotherapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma: survival data from the UKLG LY09 randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN97144519).

      Johnson, Peter W; Sydes, Matthew R; Hancock, Barry W; Cullen, Michael H; Radford, John A; Stenning, Sally P; University of Southampton, Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinical Trials Unit, London, United Kingdom. (2010-07-10)
      PURPOSE: This study analyzed the outcomes of nonrandomized consolidation radiotherapy (RT) given after chemotherapy in the initial treatment of advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). The results were collected prospectively within a randomized controlled trial of induction chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were randomly assigned between doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine and one of two prespecified multidrug regimens. At least six cycles of chemotherapy were planned, with up to eight for patients showing slower response. Involved-field RT was recommended for incomplete response to chemotherapy or bulk disease at presentation. The primary outcome measure was progression-free survival (PFS), landmarked from the end of chemotherapy. RESULTS: Among 807 patients randomly assigned, 702 achieved objective response. Postchemotherapy RT for consolidation was reported in 300 (43%). With median follow-up of 6.9 years, 161 PFS events and 83 deaths were reported. Baseline characteristics showed more patients with bulk disease having RT (190 [63%] v 111 [28%]) and only partial response after chemotherapy (150 [50%] v 36 [9%]). Other baseline characteristics were similar. PFS was superior for patients having RT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43; 95% CI, 0.30 to 0.60) with 5-year PFS 71% without RT, 86% with RT. A similar advantage was seen for overall survival (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.77). There was no evidence of heterogeneity of treatment effect across subgroups. CONCLUSION: Patients who received consolidation RT apparently had better outcomes, consistently across all prognostic groups which persisted in multivariate analysis. This suggests that RT contributes significantly to the cure rate for advanced HL, although patient selection for combined modality treatment requires better definition in prospective trials.
    • Establishment of a UK-wide network to facilitate the acquisition of quality assured FDG-PET data for clinical trials in lymphoma.

      Barrington, S F; Mackewn, J E; Schleyer, P; Marsden, P K; Mikhaeel, N G; Qian, W; Mouncey, P; Patrick, P; Popova, B; Johnson, P; et al. (2011-03)
      Multicentre trials are required to determine how [fluorine-18]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography imaging can guide cancer treatment. Consistency in quality control (QC), scan acquisition and reporting is mandatory for high-quality results, which are comparable across sites.
    • Second cancer risk after chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma: a collaborative British cohort study.

      Swerdlow, A J; Higgins, C D; Smith, P; Cunningham, D; Hancock, B W; Horwich, A; Hoskin, P J; Lister, T A; Radford, John A; Rohatiner, A Z S; et al. (2011-11-01)
      We investigated the long-term risk of second primary malignancy after chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) in a much larger cohort than any yet published, to our knowledge.
    • The UK national breast cancer screening programme for survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma detects breast cancer at an early stage.

      Howell, Sacha J; Searle, C; Goode, Valerie; Gardener, T; Linton, Kim M; Cowan, Richard A; Harris, Maggie A; Hopwood, Penelope; Swindell, Ric; Norman, Alison; et al. (2009-08-18)
      BACKGROUND: Supradiaphragmatic radiotherapy (SRT) to treat Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) at a young age increases the risk of breast cancer (BC). A national notification risk assessment and screening programme (NRASP) for women who were treated with SRT before the age of 36 years was instituted in the United Kingdom in 2003. In this study, we report the implementation and screening results from the largest English Cancer Network. METHODS: A total of 417 eligible women were identified through cancer registry/hospital databases and from follow-up (FU) clinics. Screening results were collated retrospectively, and registry searches were used to capture BC cases. RESULTS: Of the 417 women invited for clinical review, 243 (58%) attended. Of these 417 women, 23 (5.5%) have been diagnosed with BC, a standardised incidence ratio of 2.9 compared with the age-matched general population. Of five invasive BCs diagnosed within the NRASP, none involved axillary lymph nodes compared with 7 of 13 (54%) diagnosed outside the programme (P<0.10). The mean latency for BC cases was 19.5+/-8.35 years and the mean FU duration for those unaffected by BC was 14.6+/-9.11 years (P<0.01), suggesting that those unaffected by BC remain at high risk. Recall and negative biopsy rates were acceptable (10.5 and 0.8%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The NRASP appears to detect BC at an early stage with acceptable biopsy rates, although numbers are small. Determination of NRASP results on a national basis is required for the accurate evaluation of screening efficacy in women previously treated with SRT.