• Phase II study of cisplatin and imatinib in advanced salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

      Ghosal, N; Mais, Kathleen L; Shenjere, Patrick; Julyan, Peter J; Hastings, David L; Ward, Timothy H; Ryder, W David J; Bruce, I; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; et al. (2011-10)
      Patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands show over-expression of KIT in a high proportion of cases. Options for systemic treatment are limited in locally advanced and metastatic disease. We explored the efficacy of imatinib and cisplatin combined in this group of patients. A Gehan's two-stage, phase II trial was conducted on 28 patients. Those with progressive, locally advanced, and metastatic disease with an over-expression of KIT were treated with single agent imatinib 800 mg daily for two months, followed by a combination of imatinib 400mg daily and cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) at four-weekly intervals for six cycles. This was followed by maintenance single agent imatinib 400mg daily until the disease progressed. Response was monitored using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and morphological imaging using computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and chest radiographs (CT/MRI/CXR). Morphological imaging showed partial response in three of 28 patients, and five patients showed a response on FDG-PET. In addition, 19 patients had useful stabilisation of disease. The median time to progression and overall survival was 15 months (range 1-43) and 35 months (range 1-75), respectively. The combination of imatinib and cisplatin was reasonably well tolerated. This combination may provide stabilisation in locally advanced and metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.
    • Phase III randomised trial of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy compared with platinum-based chemotherapy in small-cell lung cancer.

      Baka, Sofia; Califano, Raffaele; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Ashcroft, Linda; Thatcher, Nick; Taylor, Pat; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Blackhall, Fiona H; Lorigan, Paul C; Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2008-08-05)
      This randomised trial compared platinum-based to anthracycline-based chemotherapy in patients with small-cell lung cancer (limited or extensive stage) and
    • Point: why choose pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for treating gynecologic cancers?

      Davidson, Susan E; Hendry, Jolyon H; West, Catharine M L; Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. Susan.Davidson@christie.nhs.uk (2010-08-09)
    • Prediction of post-treatment trismus in head and neck cancer patients.

      Lee, Rana; Slevin, Nicholas J; Musgrove, Brian; Swindell, Ric; Molassiotis, Alexander; Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2011-07-25)
      Our aim was to establish the incidence of trismus over time, together with risk factors (including quality of life (QoL)) for the prediction of trismus after treatment in patients with cancer of the head and neck. It was a longitudinal study of 152 patients accepted for primary operation who attended the head and neck cancer clinic of a tertiary referral cancer centre in the United Kingdom. A total of 87 patients was studied prospectively. Our results showed that 41/87 (47%) of patients presented with trismus, 57/80 (71%) had postoperative trismus, and 41/52 (79%) had trismus 6 months after operation or radiotherapy (trismus defined as a maximum mouth opening of ≤35mm). Men and those who drank a lot of alcohol were less likely to have trismus after treatment. QoL variables showed that pain, eating, chewing, taste, saliva, social functioning, social contact, and dry mouth were significantly more impaired in the trismus group than among those without trismus. Postoperative differences in QoL between the two groups highlighted problems with social function and role-playing, fatigue, activity, recreation, and overall reduction in QoL. Women, and those who do not drink alcohol, are at particularly high risk of developing trismus, and, to prevent it and treat it, patients may benefit from multidisciplinary management at an early stage during treatment.
    • Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan in magnetic resonance imaging-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: impact on long-term clinical outcomes.

      Gollins, S; Sun Myint, A; Haylock, Brian; Wise, M; Saunders, Mark P; Neupane, R; Essapen, S; Samuel, L; Dougal, Mark; Lloyd, A; et al. (2011-03-10)
      To assess long-term clinical outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma using concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine.
    • Preoperative downstaging chemoradiation with concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine in MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: a phase I trial (NWCOG-2).

      Gollins, Simon W; Myint, S; Susnerwala, S; Haylock, B; Wise, M; Topham, C; Samuel, L; Swindell, Ric; Morris, J; Mason, L; et al. (2009-09-15)
      BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of neoadjuvant chemoradiation using radiotherapy (RT) combined with concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan for locally advanced rectal cancer before surgery. METHODS: Forty-six patients were recruited and treated on the basis that MRI scanning had shown poor-risk tumours with threatening (< or =1 mm) or involvement of the mesorectal fascia. Conformal RT was given using 3 or 4 fields at daily fractions of 1.8 Gy on 5 days per week to a total dose of 45 Gy. Concurrently oral capecitabine was given twice daily throughout radiotherapy continuously from days 1 to 35 and intravenous irinotecan was given once per week during weeks 1 to 4 of RT. Dose levels were gradually escalated as follows. Dose level 1: capecitabine 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 50 mg m(-2); Dose level 2: capecitabine 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 60 mg m(-2); Dose level 3: capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 60 mg m(2); Dose level 4: capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 70 mg m(-2). RESULTS: Diarrhoea (grade 3, no grade 4) was the main serious acute toxicity with lesser degrees of fatigue, neutropenia, anorexia and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. The recommended dose for future study was dose level 2 at which 3 of 14 patients (21%) developed grade 3 diarrhoea. Postoperative complications included seven pelvic or wound infections and two anastomotic and two perineal wound dehiscences. There were no deaths in the first 30 days postoperatively. Of 41 resected specimens, 11 (27%) showed a pathological complete response (pCR) and five (12%) showed an involved circumferential resection margin (defined as < or =1 mm). The 3-year disease-free survival (intent-to-treat) was 53.2%. CONCLUSION: In patients with poor-risk MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer threatening or involving the mesorectal fascia, preoperative chemoradiation based on RT at 45 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks with continuous daily oral capecitabine at 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. days 1-35 and weekly IV irinotecan at 60 mg m(-2) weeks 1-4, provides acceptable acute toxicity and postoperative morbidity with encouraging response and curative resection rates.
    • Preoperative neo-adjuvant therapy for curable rectal cancer--reaching a consensus 2008.

      Scott, N A; Susnerwala, Shabbir; Gollins, Simon W; Myint, A Sun; Levine, Edward; Department of Colorectal Surgery, Lancashire Teaching Hospital Trust, Preston, UK. nigel.scott@lthtr.nhs.uk (2009-03)
      OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to determine the range of neo-adjuvant therapy the multidisciplinary team (MDT) currently offers patients with curable (M(0)) rectal cancer. METHOD: A senior oncologist from each of the four oncology centres in north Wales and the north-west of England (approximate target population 8 million - Glan Clwyd, Clatterbridge, Christie and Preston) reviewed his/her understanding of the current evidence of neo-adjuvant therapy in rectal cancer. Then a representative from each centre was asked to identify which of three neo-adjuvant options (no neo-adjuvant therapy, short-course radiotherapy 25 Gy over five fractions and long-course chemoradiotherapy) he/she would use for a rectal cancer in the upper, middle or lower third of the rectum staged by magnetic resonance imaging as being T(2)-T(4) and/or N(0)-N(2). RESULTS: In all cases of locally advanced rectal cancer (T(3a) N(1)-T(4)), oncologists from the four oncology centres recommended long-course chemoradiotherapy before rectal resection. This consensus was maintained for cases of lower third T(3a) N(0) cancers. Thereafter, the majority of patients with rectal cancer are offered adjuvant short-course radiotherapy. CONCLUSION: Neo-adjuvant therapy is less likely to be offered if the tumour is early (T(2), N(0)) and/or situated in the upper third of the rectum.
    • Primary Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Retromolar Trigone; A Useful Alternative to Surgery.

      Bayman, Neil A; Sykes, Andrew J; Bonington, Suzanne C; Blackburn, T; Patel, M; Swindell, Ric; Slevin, Nicholas J; Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. (2009-12-03)
      AIMS: Squamous cell carcinoma of the retromolar trigone is uncommon. The standard initial treatment is primary surgery, which usually involves microvascular reconstruction with a composite flap. Some patients are considered unsuitable for this procedure. This retrospective study examined the outcome and toxicity for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the retromolar trigone treated with definitive radiotherapy in a single centre. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1991 and 2000, 43 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy with a median dose of 50Gy in 16 fractions over 21 days. Hospital case notes and radiotherapy records were analysed. RESULTS: The median age was 66 years (range 39-84 years). Nodal disease was evident in 13 (30.2%) patients. Twenty-one patients (51.2%) had stage I/II disease and 20 patients (48.8%) had stage III/IV disease. After a median follow-up of 59 months, 13 (30.2%) patients were alive and well, nine (20.9%) patients had died of an intercurrent illness and 21 (48.8%) had died of their disease. Five-year locoregional control was 46.5% (95% confidence interval 29.7-61.7), cause-specific survival was 45.7% (95% confidence interval 29.1-60.8) and overall survival was 30.9% (95% confidence interval 17.5-46.3). Osteoradionecrosis was documented in two patients. DISCUSSION: This hypofractionated regimen is convenient for this patient population and produced comparable outcomes to longer fractionation schedules without an increase in late toxicity.
    • Prophylactic cranial irradiation in extensive disease small-cell lung cancer: short-term health-related quality of life and patient reported symptoms: results of an international Phase III randomized controlled trial by the EORTC Radiation Oncology and Lung Cancer Groups.

      Slotman, Berend J; Mauer, Murielle E; Bottomley, Andrew; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Kramer, Gijs; Rankin, Elaine M; Snee, Michael; Hatton, Matthew; Postmus, Pieter E; Collette, Laurence; et al. (2009-01-01)
      PURPOSE: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in patients with extensive-disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC) leads to significantly fewer symptomatic brain metastases and improved survival. Detailed effects of PCI on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are reported here. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients (age, 18 to 75 years; WHO < or = 2) with ED-SCLC, and any response to chemotherapy, were randomly assigned to either observation or PCI. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and patient-reported symptoms were secondary end points. The European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer core HRQOL tool (Quality of Life Questionnaire C30) and brain module (Quality of Life Questionnaire Brain Cancer Module) were used to collect self-reported patient data. Six HRQOL scales were selected as primary HRQOL end points: global health status; hair loss; fatigue; and role, cognitive and emotional functioning. Assessments were performed at random assignment, 6 weeks, 3 months, and then 3-monthly up to 1 year and 6-monthly thereafter. RESULTS: Compliance with the HRQOL assessment was 93.7% at baseline and dropped to 60% at 6 weeks. Short-term results up to 3 months showed that there was a negative impact of PCI on selected HRQOL scales. The largest mean difference between the two arms was observed for fatigue and hair loss. The impact of PCI on global health status as well as on functioning scores was more limited. For global health status, the observed mean difference was eight points on a scale 0 to 100 at 6 weeks (P = .018) and 3 months (P = .055). CONCLUSION: PCI should be offered to all responding ED SCLC patients. Patients should be informed of the potential adverse effects from PCI. Clinicians should be alert to these; monitor their patients; and offer appropriate support, clinical, and psychosocial care.
    • Prophylactic radiotherapy to intervention sites in mesothelioma: a systematic review and survey of UK practice.

      Lee, Caroline; Bayman, Neil A; Swindell, Ric; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2009-11)
      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), who undergo chest instrumentation, may develop seeding at the site of intervention, leading to subcutaneous tumour. This is believed to be reduced by the common practice of prophylactic irradiation to intervention tracts (PIT). However, evidence to support PIT is currently inadequate and contentious. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out a systematic search of published literature for articles relating to the incidence of chest wall intervention tract metastases and the use of PIT in mesothelioma. In addition, a survey of current practice was conducted in 54 UK oncology centres. RESULTS: Fourteen studies revealed an incidence of chest wall intervention tract metastases of 0-48% with a trend toward a higher rate of metastases for more invasive procedures. Three randomised controlled trials (RCTs), two prospective non-randomised studies and five retrospective series met the eligibility criteria to evaluate the role of PIT in MPM. Of the three RCTs, two did not support the use of PIT. None of the RCTs included patients who had received systemic chemotherapy. Of the oncology centres responding to the survey, 75% practiced PIT, and 80% would be interested in a trial to determine the efficacy of PIT. CONCLUSIONS: No consensus has been reached to support the use of PIT. However, most centres in the UK still offer PIT. There was widespread interest in a randomised controlled trial to establish PIT efficacy in the era of effective systemic chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma.
    • A prospective observational study of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting in routine practice in a UK cancer centre.

      Molassiotis, Alexander; Saunders, Mark P; Valle, Juan W; Wilson, Gregory; Lorigan, Paul C; Wardley, Andrew M; Levine, Edward; Cowan, Richard A; Loncaster, Juliette A; Rittenberg, C; et al. (2008-02)
      OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess levels of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in routine practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was an observational prospective evaluation using patient self-reports. One hundred and two patients with cancer in a single cancer centre in UK receiving their first chemotherapy treatment participated in the study and were followed up over four cycles, providing a total of 272 assessments of nausea and vomiting. Data was collected with the use of the MASCC Antiemesis Tool (MAT), which is an eight-item short clinical scale assessing acute and delayed nausea and vomiting after chemotherapy. RESULTS: Results indicated that acute vomiting was experienced by 15.7% of the patients in cycle 1 and delayed vomiting by 14.7%, while acute nausea was present in 37.3% of the patients and delayed nausea in 47.1%, increasing over the subsequent cycles. Moderately emetogenic and highly emetogenic chemotherapy had the highest incidence of CINV, whereas patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy showed significant levels of delayed nausea. Acute symptoms were more easily controlled than delayed symptoms. DISCUSSION: The data suggest that, while vomiting is well controlled, nausea remains a significant problem in practice, and optimal management of CINV is yet to be achieved. Understanding more clearly the biological basis of nausea will assist in managing this complex symptom more effectively in practice.
    • Protocol for the combined immunosuppression & radiotherapy in thyroid eye disease (CIRTED) trial: A multi-centre, double-masked, factorial randomised controlled trial.

      Rajendram, Rathie; Lee, Richard W J; Potts, Mike J; Rose, Geoff E; Jain, Rajni; Olver, Jane M; Bremner, Fion; Hurel, Steven; Cook, Anne; Gattamaneni, Rao; et al. (2008)
      ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Medical management of thyroid eye disease remains controversial due to a paucity of high quality evidence on long-term treatment outcomes. Glucocorticoids are known to be effective initially but have significant side-effects with long-term use and recrudescence can occur on cessation. Current evidence is conflicting on the efficacy of radiotherapy and non-steroid systemic immunosuppression, and the majority of previous studies have been retrospective, uncontrolled, small or poorly designed.The Combined Immunosuppression and Radiotherapy in Thyroid Eye Disease (CIRTED) trial was designed to investigate the efficacy of radiotherapy and azathioprine in combination with a standard course of oral prednisolone in patients with active thyroid eye disease. METHODS/DESIGN: Patients with active thyroid eye disease will be randomised to receive (i) azathioprine or oral placebo and (ii) radiotherapy or sham-radiotherapy in this multi-centre, factorial randomised control trial. The primary outcome is improvement in disease severity (assessed using a composite binary measure) at 12 months and secondary end-points include quality of life scores and health economic measures. DISCUSSION: The CIRTED trial is the first study to evaluate the role of radiotherapy and azathioprine as part of a long-term, combination immunosuppressive treatment regime for Thyroid Eye Disease. It will provide evidence for the role of radiotherapy and prolonged immunosuppression in the management of this condition, as well as pilot data on their use in combination. We have paid particular attention in the trial design to establishing (a) robust placebo controls and masking protocols which are effective and safe for both radiotherapy and the systemic administration of an antiproliferative drug; (b) constructing effective inclusion and exclusion criteria to select for active disease; and (c) selecting pragmatic outcome measures. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Current controlled trials ISRCTN22471573.
    • Psoas abscess: an unusual presentation of a metastatic breast cancer after 25 years.

      Satpathy, Anjana; Burt, Paul A; Guy, Andrew J; Department of General Surgery, Leighton Hospital, Crewe, UK. anjana_satpathy@yahoo.co.uk (2009-04-01)
    • Radiotherapy for small-cell lung cancer-Where are we heading?

      Bayman, Neil A; Sheikh, Hamid Y; Kularatne, B; Lorigan, Paul C; Blackhall, Fiona H; Thatcher, Nick; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2009-03)
      Radiotherapy has an established role in the management of limited-disease small-cell lung cancer. However, essential questions related to the optimisation of thoracic radiotherapy remain unanswered including (i) optimal total dose, (ii) fractionation, (iii) timing and sequencing of radiation, (iv) volume of irradiation, and (v) concurrent chemotherapy combinations. The role of thoracic radiotherapy for extensive-disease small-cell lung cancer is more poorly understood but evidence suggests radiotherapy may have an important role in this setting. This review highlights the need for well-designed multi-national trials aimed at the optimisation and standardisation of radiotherapy for SCLC.
    • Radiotherapy for the treatment of longstanding head and neck hemangioma.

      Douglas, Catriona Mairi; Ho, Kean F; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. Catriona.douglas@christie.nhs.uk (2009-08)
    • Randomised phase II trial of 4 dose levels of single agent docetaxel in performance status (PS) 2 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): DOC PS2 trial. Manchester lung cancer group.

      Califano, Raffaele; Griffiths, Richard W; Lorigan, Paul C; Ashcroft, Linda; Taylor, Paul; Burt, Paul A; Lee, Lip W; Chittalia, Abbas; Harris, Maggie A; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; et al. (2011-09)
      The role of chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC patients and ECOG PS2 remains controversial. We evaluated 4 doses of 3-weekly docetaxel to identify a less toxic, clinically effective dose.
    • Rechallenging with anthracyclines and taxanes in metastatic breast cancer.

      Palmieri, C; Krell, J; James, C R; Harper-Wynne, C; Misra, Vivek; Cleator, S; Miles, D; Cancer Research UK Laboratories, Department of Oncology, MRC Cyclotron Building, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Du Cane Road, London W12 ONN, UK. c.palmieri@imperial.ac.uk (2010-10)
      Adjuvant use of anthracycline-taxane combination therapy is an accepted strategy in the management of high-risk early-stage breast cancer. However, the introduction of this regimen raises the question of how best to manage those patients who relapse following adjuvant therapy, and whether there is a role for rechallenging in the metastatic setting with the same agent, or class of agent, that has been utilized in the adjuvant setting. This Review examines the evidence for rechallenging with both anthracyclines and taxanes, and highlights the issues that need to be examined in the context of future clinical trials.
    • Reciprocal relationship between expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and the pro-apoptotic protein bid in ex vivo colorectal cancer.

      Seenath, M M; Roberts, Darren L; Cawthorne, Christopher; Saunders, Mark P; Armstrong, G; O'Dwyer, Sarah T; Stratford, Ian J; Dive, Caroline; Renehan, Andrew G; Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology, Paterson Institute of Cancer Research, Manchester, UK. (2008-08-05)
      Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) represses the transcription of pro-apoptotic bid in colorectal cancer cells in vitro. To assess the clinical relevance of this observation, HIF-1alpha and Bid were assessed in serial sections of 39 human colorectal adenocarcinomas by immunohistochemistry. In high HIF-1alpha nuclear-positive cell subpopulations, there was a significant reduction in Bid expression (ANOVA, P=0.04). Given the role of Bid in drug-induced apoptosis, these data add impetus to strategies targeting HIF-1 for therapeutic gain.
    • Rectal motion can reduce CTV coverage and increase rectal dose during prostate radiotherapy: A daily cone-beam CT study.

      Sripadam, Raj; Stratford, Julia; Henry, Ann M; Jackson, Andrew; Moore, Christopher J; Price, Patricia M; Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington, Wirral, UK. (2009-03)
      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Daily on-treatment verification cone-beam CT (CBCT) was used to study the effect of rectal motion on clinical target volume (CTV) coverage during prostate radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: CBCT scans were acquired from 15 patients immediately after daily treatment. From these images, the rectum was contoured allowing the analysis of rectal volume cross-sectional area (CSA) and the determination of rectal dose. Rectal wall motion was quantified as a surrogate measure of prostate displacement and CTV coverage was subjectively assessed. RESULTS: Rectal volume decreased over the treatment course in 13 patients (P<0.001). Rectal wall regions corresponding to the prostate base displayed the greatest motion; larger displacements were seen in patients with larger rectal planning volumes. CTV coverage was inadequate, at the prostate base only, in 38% of the fractions delivered to 4/7 patients with a large rectum at planning (>100 cm(3)). In patients with small rectum at planning (<50 cm(3)) up to 25% more rectal volume than predicted was included in the high-dose region. CONCLUSIONS: Rectal motion during treatment in prostate cancer patients has implications for CTV coverage and rectal dose. Measures to ensure consistency in daily rectal volume or image-guided strategies should be considered.
    • Report on the early efficacy and tolerability of I(125) permanent prostate brachytherapy from a UK multi-institutional database.

      Mitchell, Darren M; Mandall, Paula; Bottomley, David; Hoskin, Peter J; Logue, John P; Ash, D; Ostler, P; Elliott, Tony; Henry, Ann M; Wylie, James P; et al. (2008-12)
      AIMS: To report the results of I(125) prostate brachytherapy from a central, prospectively collected database of three UK institutions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients treated with I(125) permanent prostate brachytherapy at the Christie Hospital, Manchester (CHM), Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (CKL) and Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, London (MVL) since 2003 have been prospectively registered on a detailed central database. Patient, tumour, pre- and post-implant dosimetry data have been recorded. Urinary toxicity as assessed by the International Prostate Symptom Score, catheterisation and urinary stricture rates after implant have been documented and biochemical failure determined, using both the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus and the Phoenix (nadir + 2 ng/ml) definition. RESULTS: In total, 1535 patients were registered on the database between January 2003 and October 2006, including 432 from CHM, 926 from CKL and 177 from MVL, with a median follow-up of 21 months (range 1-56). Patient and tumour characteristics were similar at all centres. Pre-implant dose indices were comparable between centres, except for the V150, with median values of 51.9, 64.3 and 69.8% at CHM, CKL and MVL, respectively. Median post-implant dose parameters were lower than pre-planned constraints by up to 33.0% at each centre for all values, except at CKL where the V200 was 23.9% higher. The International Prostate Symptom Score increased from a median of 5 at baseline to 18, 6 weeks after implant, but was not significantly different to baseline values by 12 months. Nine per cent of men required catheterisation after implant for a median duration of 53 days, but urinary stricture rates remained low at 1%. Neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation was used in 228 men (15%) for downsizing and 159 (10%) for intermediate/high-risk disease. Collated biochemical failure rates were low at this point of follow-up, with actuarial 2-year ASTRO and Phoenix biochemical failure-free survival rates of 94.4 and 94.5%, respectively, consistent with other large single centre reports. When post-implant dosimetric factors were assessed for a relationship to biochemical failure, no indices consistently predicted for improved ASTRO and Phoenix biochemical failure-free survival rates. CONCLUSIONS: This ongoing collaboration shows that with limited infrastructure (a single industry-sponsored data manager), a large multi-institutional database estimated to represent one-third of implants carried out in the UK during this time can be developed. Patient selection was similar across all centres and adhered to published guidelines. Early biochemical and toxicity outcomes confirm the efficacy and tolerability of I(125) prostate brachytherapy in a large cohort of patients. A further analysis is planned.