• Collagen vascular diseases and enhanced radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects--a case report and a review of published studies.

      Lee, C E; Prabhu, V; Slevin, Nicholas J; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. carolinelee@christie.nhs.co.uk (2011-03)
      Collagen vascular diseases (CVD) are a group of chronic, autoimmune conditions that can affect multiple organ systems. The mainstay of treatment involves the use of immunosuppressants. CVDs and immunosuppression increase the risk of these patients developing malignancy. The mechanisms through which these patients develop CVDs show similarities to those for radiotherapy late effects, especially fibrosis (via transforming growth factor β). Radiotherapy may in fact cause an active state to develop from a quiescent state of CVD, or exacerbate a pre-existing CVD. CVDs are said to be associated with increased normal tissue toxicity after radiotherapy. Here we present a case report of a patient with a long history of systemic lupus erythematosus and oropharyngeal carcinoma, treated with synchronous chemoradiotherapy. We also review published studies and formulate some guidance on the radiotherapy management of these patients.
    • Combined androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: a randomised, phase 3 trial.

      Warde, P; Mason, M; Ding, K; Kirkbride, P; Brundage, M; Cowan, Richard A; Gospodarowicz, M; Sanders, K; Kostashuk, E; Swanson, G; et al. (2011-12-17)
      Whether the addition of radiation therapy (RT) improves overall survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer managed with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is unclear. Our aim was to compare outcomes in such patients with locally advanced prostate cancer.
    • Comparison of patient-reported late treatment toxicity (LENT-SOMA) with quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-H&N35) assessment after head and neck radiotherapy.

      Ho, Kean F; Farnell, Damian J J; Routledge, Jacqueline A; Burns, Meriel P; Sykes, Andrew J; Slevin, Nicholas J; Davidson, Susan E; Academic Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. (2010-06-14)
      PURPOSE: The patient's role in toxicity reporting is increasingly acknowledged but requires the adaptation and validation of toxicity reporting instruments for patient use as most toxicity scales are designed for physician use. Recording of radiotherapy related late toxicity is important and needs to be improved. A patient-scored symptom questionnaire of late treatment effects using LENT-SOMA was compared with a recognised quality of life tool (EORTC QLQ-C30/H&N35). MATERIALS/METHODS: LENT-SOMA and EORTC QLQ-C30 patient questionnaires were prospectively completed by 220 head and neck cancer patients over 3years and 72 completed EORTC QLQ-H&N35 questionnaires at 2years post-radiotherapy. RESULTS: Endpoints common to both questionnaires (pain, swallowing, dental pain, dry mouth, opening mouth, analgesics) were matched. Spearman rank correlation coefficients with rho>0.6 (P<0.001) were obtained for all "matched" scales except for analgesics scale, rho=0.267 (P<0.05). There was good agreement between LENT-SOMA and EORTC QLQ-H&N35 except for analgesic endpoints. Global quality of life scores correlated negatively with average LENT-SOMA scores (P<0.001). Significant differences in average LENT-SOMA scores between treatment modalities were found. The LENT-SOMA questionnaire has demonstrated a high Cronbach's alpha value (0.786) indicating good reliability. CONCLUSIONS: LENT-SOMA patient questionnaire results agreed well with those from the EORTC QLQ-H&N35 questionnaire for toxicity items where they could be compared explicitly, particularly for subjective endpoints. Patient-reported late toxicity had a negative impact on quality of life. The LENT-SOMA patient questionnaire is both reliable and sensitive to differences between patients treated with different modalities. A patient-based questionnaire is an important contributor to capturing late radiotherapy effects.
    • Cost analysis of biomarker testing for mismatch repair deficiency in node-positive colorectal cancer.

      Barrow, E; McMahon, R; Evans, D Gareth R; Levine, Edward; Hill, J; Department of General Surgery, Manchester Royal Infirmary, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK. emma.barrow@doctors.org.uk (2008-07)
      BACKGROUND: Microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer is caused by defective DNA mismatch repair (MMR). It is present in 15 per cent of sporadic colorectal cancers owing to epigenetic mutL homologue 1 (MLH1) inactivation. The evidence suggests that patients with tumours caused by defective DNA MMR do not benefit from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. METHODS: The proportion of cancers with defective DNA MMR identified by MSI analysis or immunohistochemistry was calculated from published data. The cost of analysis was compared with the potential savings if 5-FU-based chemotherapy was not administered to these patients. RESULTS: Some 16.3 per cent of sporadic colorectal cancers had defective DNA MMR. Immunostaining for MLH1 and mutS homologue 2 (MSH2) had a sensitivity of 92.4 per cent and a specificity of 99.6 per cent for identifying MSI-high tumours. The strongest predictive variable was right-sidedness, with positive and negative predictive values of 0.329 and 0.948 respectively. If 5-FU-based chemotherapy were not administered, potential savings of up to pound 1.2 million per 1000 patients tested could be made. Costs would be higher if alternative chemotherapeutic regimens were substituted as a result of testing. CONCLUSION: Knowledge of MMR status may enable participation in trials of non-5-FU-based chemotherapy. The cost of MMR testing may be offset by more efficient use of chemotherapy.
    • CpG methylation profiling in VHL related and VHL unrelated renal cell carcinoma.

      McRonald, Fiona E; Morris, Mark R; Gentle, Dean; Winchester, Laura; Baban, Dilair; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Clarke, Noel W; Brown, Michael D; Kishida, Takeshi; Yao, Masahiro; et al. (2009)
      BACKGROUND: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is histopathologically heterogeneous with clear cell and papillary the most common subtypes. The most frequent molecular abnormality in clear cell RCC is VHL inactivation but promoter methylation of tumour suppressor genes is common in both subtypes of RCC. To investigate whether RCC CpG methylation status was influenced by histopathology and VHL status we performed high-throughput epigenetic profiling using the Illumina Goldengate Methylation Array in 62 RCC (29 RCC from von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease patients, 20 sporadic clear cell RCC with wild type VHL and 13 sporadic papillary RCC). RESULTS: 43 genes were methylated in >20% of primary RCC (range 20-45%) and most (37/43) of these had not been reported previously to be methylated in RCC. The distribution of the number of methylated CpGs in individual tumours differed from the expected Poisson distribution (p < 0.00001; log-likelihood G test) suggesting that a subset of RCC displayed a CpG Island Methylator Phenotype. Comparison of RCC subtypes revealed that, on average, tumour specific CpG methylation was most prevalent in papillary RCC and least in VHL RCC. Many of the genes preferentially methylated in pRCC were linked to TGFbeta or ERK/Akt signalling. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate differing patterns of tumour-specific CpG methylation in VHL and non VHL clear cell RCC and papillary RCC, and identify multiple novel potential CpG methylation biomarkers for RCC.
    • Cribriform-morular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: molecular characterization of a case with neuroendocrine differentiation and aggressive behavior.

      Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Menasce, Lia P; Yap, Beng K; Colaco, Rovel J; Castro, Patricia; Celestino, Ricardo; Ruíz-Ponte, Clara; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Department of Pathology, Clinical University Hospital, Galician Health Service, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. (2009-01)
      We describe an especially aggressive case of cribriform-morular variant (C-MV) of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in a 42-year-old man with familial adenomatous polyposis who died with lung and brain metastases 17 months after thyroidectomy. The angioinvasive neoplasm combined a mixture of trabecular, solid, cribriform, and follicular patterns of growth with CD10+ morules. Follicles were devoid of colloid, and the nuclear features typical of PTC were present in some areas and missing in others. Tumor cells were positive for thyroid transcription factor-1 and, in 40% of the tumoral mass, also were positive for chromogranin and synaptophysin and were negative for thyroglobulin and calcitonin. Strong nuclear staining for beta-catenin was found in all tumor cells, as was positivity for p53 and cyclin D1. In addition to the germline heterozygous APC Ex 2-3 duplication mutation, a somatic homozygous silent p. Thr1493Thr gene variant was found in the neoplastic cells along with RET/PTC rearrangement. This tumor represents the first case of C-MV of PTC showing neuroendocrine differentiation.
    • Current treatment approaches for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

      Illidge, Timothy M; Tolan, Shaun; School of Cancer Imaging Sciences, CR UK Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. tmi@manchester.ac.uk (2008-04)
      There have been two major developments over the last decade that has led to improvements in outcome and longer survival for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These developments have been firstly to increase the dose of active cytotoxic drugs and shorten the time between cycles, resulting in dose-dense and/or dose-intense regimens and secondly the addition of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab to chemotherapy. Both strategies have been associated with higher response rates, lower relapse rates, longer event-free survival (EFS) and improved overall survival (OS), particularly in better prognostic groups. A combination of dose-dense and dose-intense chemotherapy regimens plus rituximab is currently being tested to confirm that the use of both approaches confers survival advantage. High-risk, poorer-prognosis DLBCL remains a challenge, and new treatment strategies are required for these patients. Improvements in outcome may potentially be achieved through a greater understanding of the genetic abnormalities specifically associated with poorer-prognosis disease, and factors that lead to unresponsiveness to chemotherapy. The role of radiotherapy is currently less clearly defined than at anytime in the management of DLBCL and the current evidence for using radiotherapy in this disease is therefore rigorously reviewed.
    • Developing a CTCAEs patient questionnaire for late toxicity after head and neck radiotherapy.

      Ho, Kean F; Farnell, Damian J J; Routledge, Jacqueline A; Burns, Meriel P; Sykes, Andrew J; Slevin, Nicholas J; Davidson, Susan E; Academic Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom. (2009-05-06)
      PURPOSE: Patient-based reporting of symptoms is increasingly important in providing treatment toxicity information. However, observer-based scoring systems such as the CTCAEs which incorporate the LENT-SOMA scales are not adapted for patient-based reporting. We aim to (1) report the late toxicity in patients following head and neck radiotherapy using a LENT-SOMA patient-based questionnaire, (2) describe how the responses help to improve the questionnaire and (3) adapt the questionnaire for patient reporting using CTCAEs. METHODS: A 31-item LENT-SOMA patient questionnaire was administered prospectively to 220 patients pre-treatment and at eight time periods post-radical head and neck radiotherapy over 3 years. Exploratory factor analysis was carried out and questionnaire reliability was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. RESULTS: At 3-years follow-up, grade 3/4 toxicity was recorded for xerostomia (44%), hoarseness (14.3%), altered taste (6.1%) and oropharyngeal pain (1.9%). Factor analysis indicated that questionnaire division according to anatomical sub-site was reasonable. Cronbach's alpha was 0.851 (95% CI: 0.820-0.883) indicating high reliability. Good compliance was obtained with all questions except for the 'weight loss' item. A satisfaction survey showed that the questionnaire was clear and concise. Teeth and mandible sections have been removed. Dietary change due to xerostomia has been incorporated in line with CTCAEs. LENT-SOMA scoring of analgesic needs and dysphagia not described in CTCAEs were found useful and have been retained. CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaire has enabled reporting of late toxicity and the responses have enabled refinement of the questionnaire. It is reliable, feasible and has been validated for patient-based collection of CTCAEs late toxicity data.
    • Development and validation of a nomogram for prediction of survival and local control in laryngeal carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy alone: a cohort study based on 994 patients.

      Egelmeer, A G T M; Velazquez, E R; de Jong, J M A; Oberije, C; Geussens, Y; Nuyts, S; Kremer, B; Rietveld, D; Leemans, C R; de Jong, M; et al. (2011-07)
      To advise laryngeal carcinoma patients on the most appropriate form of treatment, a tool to predict survival and local control is needed.
    • Effect of epoetin alfa on survival and cancer treatment-related anemia and fatigue in patients receiving radical radiotherapy with curative intent for head and neck cancer.

      Hoskin, Peter J; Robinson, Martin; Slevin, Nicholas J; Morgan, David; Harrington, Kevin; Gaffney, Christopher; Marie Curie Research Wing for Oncology, Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex, UK. peterhoskin@nhs.net (2009-12-01)
      PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of epoetin alfa on local disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer treatment-related anemia and fatigue in patients with head and neck cancer receiving radical radiotherapy with curative intent. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients (N = 301) with hemoglobin (Hb) less than 15 g/dL were randomly assigned in a ratio of 1:1 to receive radiotherapy plus epoetin alfa (10,000 U subcutaneously [SC] three times weekly if baseline Hb was < 12.5 g/dL; 4,000 U SC three times weekly if baseline Hb > or = 12.5 g/dL) or radiotherapy alone. Hb levels were monitored weekly. The primary end point was local DFS, defined as the time from random assignment to local disease recurrence or death. Secondary efficacy end points included OS, local tumor response, and local tumor control. Patients were followed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks postradiotherapy and annually for 5 years. Cancer treatment-related anemia and fatigue were evaluated with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck. Adverse events were recorded up to 12 weeks postradiotherapy. RESULTS: Hb levels increased from baseline with epoetin alfa. The median duration of local DFS was not statistically different between groups (observation, 35.42 months; epoetin alfa, 31.47 months; hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.41). Groups did not significantly differ in DFS, OS, tumor outcomes, or cancer treatment-related anemia or fatigue. No new or unexpected adverse events were observed. CONCLUSION: Addition of epoetin alfa to radical radiotherapy did not affect survival, tumor outcomes, anemia, or fatigue positively or negatively in patients with head and neck cancer.
    • Effectiveness of a home care nursing program in the symptom management of patients with colorectal and breast cancer receiving oral chemotherapy: a randomized, controlled trial.

      Molassiotis, Alexander; Brearley, Sarah; Saunders, Mark P; Craven, Olive; Wardley, Andrew M; Farrell, Carole; Swindell, Ric; Todd, Chris; Luker, Karen; University of Manchester, School of Nursing, University Place, Manchester, M13 9PL, United Kingdom. alex.molassiotis@manchester.ac.uk (2009-12-20)
      PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness of a symptom-focused home care program in patients with cancer who were receiving oral chemotherapy in relation to toxicity levels, anxiety, depression, quality of life, and service utilization. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomized, controlled trial was carried out with 164 patients with a diagnosis of colorectal (n = 110) and breast (n = 54) cancers who were receiving oral capecitabine. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either a home care program by a nurse or standard care for 18 weeks (ie, six cycles of chemotherapy). Toxicity assessments were carried out weekly for the duration of the patients' participation in the trial, and validated self-report tools assessed anxiety, depression, and quality of life. RESULTS: Significant improvements were observed in the home care group in relation to the symptoms of oral mucositis, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, pain, fatigue (first four cycles), and insomnia (all P < .05). This improvement was most significant during the initial two cycles. Unplanned service utilization, particularly the number of inpatient days (57 v 167 days; P = .02), also was lower in the home care group. CONCLUSION: A symptom-focused home care program was able to assist patients to manage their treatment adverse effects more effectively than standard care. It is imperative that patients receiving oral chemotherapy are supported with such programs, particularly during initial treatment cycles, to improve their treatment and symptom experiences.
    • Endometrial adenocarcinoma: an analysis of treatment and outcome.

      Byrd, Louise M; Swindell, Ric; Webber-Rookes, Daniel; Hannon, Robert; Hunter, Robin D; Livsey, Jacqueline E; Davidson, Susan E; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St Mary's Hospital for Women and Children, Manchester, UK. louise.byrd@cmmc.nhs.uk (2008-11)
      This study aims to review the survival and morbidity in patients treated for endometrial cancer, at a single centre and analyses the effects of co-morbidity on these outcomes. Case notes of all patients referred to the Christie Hospital with endometrial carcinoma from January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1995 (n=499) were reviewed. Twenty patients presented with recurrence and were not included in this analysis. Three hundred and seventy-five patients had previously undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy (+/- pelvic lymphadenectomy). Of these, 175 received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (XRT) only, 49 received XRT and brachytherapy, 30 received brachytherapy alone and 121 patients had no further therapy. One hundred and four patients were referred for primary treatment. Radical radiotherapy was administered to 63 patients who were unfit for surgery, with 10 of these receiving XRT + brachytherapy and 53 receiving brachytherapy alone. Thirteen patients received palliative XRT and 28 supportive care only. The overall 5-year survival for those treated radically was 73.3%. There was no significant survival difference between patients who underwent surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy, in whatever form (p=0.115). Patients who did not undergo surgery did less well as a group, although there was no significant survival difference between those treated with combination therapy or brachytherapy alone (p=0.33). Survival was significantly associated with FIGO stage, tumour grade, age (especially those >75 years) and co-morbidity (ACE-27 score). Late morbidity occurred in 46 patients, with severe toxicity affecting 12 (3.8%). Toxicity was associated with ACE-27 score (p=0.0019), treatment dose and modality, with 50% (n=6) of severe toxicity seen in patients receiving adjuvant XRT + ICT. These data demonstrate that survival in patients with endometrial carcinoma treated radically remains good, with the stage and grade of tumour being significant factors for overall survival. The incidence of severe morbidity related to radiotherapy of any modality was 3.8%. A high co-morbidity (ACE-27) score was significantly associated with poorer survival (p<0.0055) and increased late treatment morbidity (p=0.0019).
    • ERS/ESTS clinical guidelines on fitness for radical therapy in lung cancer patients (surgery and chemo-radiotherapy).

      Brunelli, A; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, C T; Rocco, G; Sculier, J-P; Varela, G; Licker, M; Ferguson, M K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, R M; et al. (2009-07)
      A collaboration of multidisciplinary experts on the functional evaluation of lung cancer patients has been facilitated by the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgery (ESTS), in order to draw up recommendations and provide clinicians with clear, up-to-date guidelines on fitness for surgery and chemo-radiotherapy. The subject was divided into different topics, which were then assigned to at least two experts. The authors searched the literature according to their own strategies, with no central literature review being performed. The draft reports written by the experts on each topic were reviewed, discussed and voted on by the entire expert panel. The evidence supporting each recommendation was summarised, and graded as described by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network Grading Review Group. Clinical practice guidelines were generated and finalized in a functional algorithm for risk stratification of the lung resection candidates, emphasising cardiological evaluation, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, systematic carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity and exercise testing. Contrary to lung resection, for which the scientific evidences are more robust, we were unable to recommend any specific test, cut-off value, or algorithm before chemo-radiotherapy due to the lack of data. We recommend that lung cancer patients should be managed in specialised settings by multidisciplinary teams.
    • Estimation of renal function -- what is appropriate in cancer patients?

      Barraclough, Lisa H; Field, Catherine; Wieringa, Gilbert E; Swindell, Ric; Livsey, Jacqueline E; Davidson, Susan E; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. lisahelenbone@hotmail.com (2008-12)
      AIMS: To compare the accuracy of renal assessment in patients with cancer using radioisotope glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine collection for creatinine clearance, Cockroft-Gault, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Wright formulae. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measurements of isotope GFR from 367 patients were compared with estimates from the described methods (Cockroft-Gault, MDRD, Wright). An analysis including a further 252 patients with an isotope GFR < or = 50 ml/min was also carried out. RESULTS: The Wright formula was the most accurate form of estimating renal function for the first study group. The formulae were similar in accuracy in the second study group. CONCLUSIONS: The Wright formula is the most accurate form of estimation of renal function in comparison with the isotope GFR for cancer patients. When there is a large proportion of patients with a low isotope GFR (< or = 50 ml/min), the formulae have similar accuracy.
    • European genome-wide association study identifies SLC14A1 as a new urinary bladder cancer susceptibility gene.

      Rafnar, T; Vermeulen, S H; Sulem, P; Thorleifsson, G; Aben, Katja K H; Witjes, J A; Grotenhuis, A J; Verhaegh, G W; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C A; Besenbacher, S; et al. (2011-11-01)
      Three genome-wide association studies in Europe and the USA have reported eight urinary bladder cancer (UBC) susceptibility loci. Using extended case and control series and 1000 Genomes imputations of 5 340 737 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we searched for additional loci in the European GWAS. The discovery sample set consisted of 1631 cases and 3822 controls from the Netherlands and 603 cases and 37 781 controls from Iceland. For follow-up, we used 3790 cases and 7507 controls from 13 sample sets of European and Iranian ancestry. Based on the discovery analysis, we followed up signals in the urea transporter (UT) gene SLC14A. The strongest signal at this locus was represented by a SNP in intron 3, rs17674580, that reached genome-wide significance in the overall analysis of the discovery and follow-up groups: odds ratio = 1.17, P = 7.6 × 10(-11). SLC14A1 codes for UTs that define the Kidd blood group and are crucial for the maintenance of a constant urea concentration gradient in the renal medulla and, through this, the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. It is speculated that rs17674580, or other sequence variants in LD with it, indirectly modifies UBC risk by affecting urine production. If confirmed, this would support the 'urogenous contact hypothesis' that urine production and voiding frequency modify the risk of UBC.
    • The European Respiratory Society and European Society of Thoracic Surgeons clinical guidelines for evaluating fitness for radical treatment (surgery and chemoradiotherapy) in patients with lung cancer.

      Brunelli, Alessandro; Charloux, Anne; Bolliger, Chris T; Rocco, Gaetano; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Varela, Gonzalo; Licker, Marc; Ferguson, Mark K; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Huber, Rudolf Maria; et al. (2009-07)
      The European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) established a joint task force with the purpose to develop clinical evidence-based guidelines on evaluation of fitness for radical therapy in patients with lung cancer. The following topics were discussed, and are summarized in the final report along with graded recommendations: Cardiologic evaluation before lung resection; lung function tests and exercise tests (limitations of ppoFEV1; DLCO: systematic or selective?; split function studies; exercise tests: systematic; low-tech exercise tests; cardiopulmonary (high tech) exercise tests); future trends in preoperative work-up; physiotherapy/rehabilitation and smoking cessation; scoring systems; advanced care management (ICU/HDU); quality of life in patients submitted to radical treatment; combined cancer surgery and lung volume reduction surgery; compromised parenchymal sparing resections and minimally invasive techniques: the balance between oncological radicality and functional reserve; neoadjuvant chemotherapy and complications; definitive chemo and radiotherapy: functional selection criteria and definition of risk; should surgical criteria be re-calibrated for radiotherapy?; the patient at prohibitive surgical risk: alternatives to surgery; who should treat thoracic patients and where these patients should be treated?
    • Evaluation of educational methods in dermatology and confidence levels: a national survey of UK medical students.

      Chiang, Yi Zhen; Tan, Kian Tjon; Chiang, Yi Ning; Burge, Susan M; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Verbov, Julian L; Department of Medicine, Salford Royal National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. chiangyizhen@gmail.com (2011-02)
      The high prevalence of skin conditions makes dermatology education an essential part of the undergraduate medical curriculum. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of different educational methods on confidence levels in dermatology among UK medical students.
    • Evidence for extrathyroidal formation of 3-iodothyronamine in humans as provided by a novel monoclonal antibody-based chemiluminescent serum immunoassay.

      Hoefig, C S; Köhrle, J; Brabant, Georg E; Dixit, Kashinath C S; Yap, Beng K; Strasburger, C J; Wu, Z; Institut für Experimentelle Endokrinologie, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. (2011-06)
      Thyronamines are thyronergic metabolites of thyroid hormones. Lack of reliable and sensitive detection methods for endogenous 3-iodothyronamine (3-T(1)AM) has so far hampered progress in understanding their physiological action and role in endocrine homeostasis or pathophysiology of diseases.
    • External beam boost for cancer of the cervix uteri when intracavitary therapy cannot be performed.

      Barraclough, Lisa H; Swindell, Ric; Livsey, Jacqueline E; Hunter, Robin D; Davidson, Susan E; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. lisahelenbone@hotmail.com (2008-07-01)
      PURPOSE: To assess the outcome of patients treated with radical radiotherapy for cervical cancer who received an external beam boost, in place of intracavitary brachytherapy (ICT), after irradiation to the whole pelvis. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Case notes were reviewed for all patients treated in this way in a single center between 1996 and 2004. Patient and tumor details, the reasons why ICT was not possible, and treatment outcome were documented. RESULTS: Forty-four patients were identified. The mean age was 56.4 years (range, 26-88 years). Clinical International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics or radiologic stage for Stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively, was 16%, 48%, 27%, and 7%. A total radiation dose of 54-70 Gy was given (75% received > or =60 Gy). Reasons for ICT not being performed were technical limitations in 73%, comorbidity or isolation limitations in 23%, and patient choice in 4%. The median follow-up was 2.3 years. Recurrent disease was seen in 48%, with a median time to recurrence of 2.3 years. Central recurrence was seen in 16 of the 21 patients with recurrent disease. The 5-year overall survival rate was 49.3%. The 3-year cancer-specific survival rate by stage was 100%, 70%, and 42% for Stages I, II, and III, respectively. Late Grades 1 and 2 bowel, bladder, and vaginal toxicity were seen in 41%. Late Grade 3 toxicity was seen in 2%. CONCLUSION: An external beam boost is a reasonable option after external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis when it is not possible to perform ICT.
    • EXTRA--a multicenter phase II study of chemoradiation using a 5 day per week oral regimen of capecitabine and intravenous mitomycin C in anal cancer.

      Glynne-Jones, Rob; Meadows, Helen; Wan, Susan; Gollins, Simon W; Leslie, Martin; Levine, Edward; McDonald, Alec C; Myint, A Sun; Samuel, Les; Sebag-Montefiore, David; et al. (2008-09-01)
      PURPOSE: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with epidermoid anal carcinoma. Clinical trials in other cancers have confirmed 5-FU can successfully be replaced by the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine. This phase II trial aimed to determine the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of capecitabine, MMC and radiotherapy (RT) in anal cancer patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT) II trial (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy). With MMC (12 mg/m2) on Day 1 and capecitabine on each RT treatment day in two divided doses (825 mg/m2 b.i.d). The endpoints were complete response at 4 weeks, local control at 6 months and toxicity. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients entered the trial. The median age was 61 years (range 45-86) with 14 males and 17 females. Compliance with chemotherapy with no dose interruptions or delays was 68%, and with RT was 81%. Eighteen (58%) patients completed both modalities of treatment as planned. Dose-limiting Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea was seen in 1 of 31 patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3 neutropenia. There were no treatment-related deaths. Four weeks following completion of chemoradiation, 24 patients (77%) had a complete clinical response, and 4 (16%) a partial response. With a median follow-up of 14 months, three locoregional relapses occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Capecitabine with MMC and RT in with patients anal carcinoma is well tolerated, with minimal toxicity and acceptable compliance. We recommend testing this schedule in future national Phase III studies in anal cancer.