• Estimation of renal function -- what is appropriate in cancer patients?

      Barraclough, Lisa H; Field, Catherine; Wieringa, Gilbert E; Swindell, Ric; Livsey, Jacqueline E; Davidson, Susan E; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. lisahelenbone@hotmail.com (2008-12)
      AIMS: To compare the accuracy of renal assessment in patients with cancer using radioisotope glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urine collection for creatinine clearance, Cockroft-Gault, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Wright formulae. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measurements of isotope GFR from 367 patients were compared with estimates from the described methods (Cockroft-Gault, MDRD, Wright). An analysis including a further 252 patients with an isotope GFR < or = 50 ml/min was also carried out. RESULTS: The Wright formula was the most accurate form of estimating renal function for the first study group. The formulae were similar in accuracy in the second study group. CONCLUSIONS: The Wright formula is the most accurate form of estimation of renal function in comparison with the isotope GFR for cancer patients. When there is a large proportion of patients with a low isotope GFR (< or = 50 ml/min), the formulae have similar accuracy.
    • European genome-wide association study identifies SLC14A1 as a new urinary bladder cancer susceptibility gene.

      Rafnar, T; Vermeulen, S H; Sulem, P; Thorleifsson, G; Aben, Katja K H; Witjes, J A; Grotenhuis, A J; Verhaegh, G W; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C A; Besenbacher, S; et al. (2011-11-01)
      Three genome-wide association studies in Europe and the USA have reported eight urinary bladder cancer (UBC) susceptibility loci. Using extended case and control series and 1000 Genomes imputations of 5 340 737 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we searched for additional loci in the European GWAS. The discovery sample set consisted of 1631 cases and 3822 controls from the Netherlands and 603 cases and 37 781 controls from Iceland. For follow-up, we used 3790 cases and 7507 controls from 13 sample sets of European and Iranian ancestry. Based on the discovery analysis, we followed up signals in the urea transporter (UT) gene SLC14A. The strongest signal at this locus was represented by a SNP in intron 3, rs17674580, that reached genome-wide significance in the overall analysis of the discovery and follow-up groups: odds ratio = 1.17, P = 7.6 × 10(-11). SLC14A1 codes for UTs that define the Kidd blood group and are crucial for the maintenance of a constant urea concentration gradient in the renal medulla and, through this, the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. It is speculated that rs17674580, or other sequence variants in LD with it, indirectly modifies UBC risk by affecting urine production. If confirmed, this would support the 'urogenous contact hypothesis' that urine production and voiding frequency modify the risk of UBC.
    • Phase II study of cisplatin and imatinib in advanced salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

      Ghosal, N; Mais, Kathleen L; Shenjere, Patrick; Julyan, Peter J; Hastings, David L; Ward, Timothy H; Ryder, W David J; Bruce, I; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; et al. (2011-10)
      Patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands show over-expression of KIT in a high proportion of cases. Options for systemic treatment are limited in locally advanced and metastatic disease. We explored the efficacy of imatinib and cisplatin combined in this group of patients. A Gehan's two-stage, phase II trial was conducted on 28 patients. Those with progressive, locally advanced, and metastatic disease with an over-expression of KIT were treated with single agent imatinib 800 mg daily for two months, followed by a combination of imatinib 400mg daily and cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) at four-weekly intervals for six cycles. This was followed by maintenance single agent imatinib 400mg daily until the disease progressed. Response was monitored using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and morphological imaging using computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and chest radiographs (CT/MRI/CXR). Morphological imaging showed partial response in three of 28 patients, and five patients showed a response on FDG-PET. In addition, 19 patients had useful stabilisation of disease. The median time to progression and overall survival was 15 months (range 1-43) and 35 months (range 1-75), respectively. The combination of imatinib and cisplatin was reasonably well tolerated. This combination may provide stabilisation in locally advanced and metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.
    • UGT1A1*28 genotype predicts gastrointestinal toxicity in patients treated with intermediate-dose irinotecan.

      Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Minchell, Laura J; Roberts, Stephen A; Tobi, Simon; Hadfield, Kristen D; Blackhall, Fiona H; Mullamitha, Saifee A; Wilson, Gregory; Valle, Juan W; Saunders, Mark P; et al. (2009-05)
      AIMS: Variants in UGT1A1 have previously been associated with toxicity from irinotecan chemotherapy. We conducted a pragmatic prospective cohort study to establish the relevance of UGT1A1 variants in the prediction of severe diarrhea and neutropenia in patients with colorectal cancer receiving irinotecan in a routine clinical setting. MATERIALS & METHODS: Genotyping of UGT1A1*28 and c.-3156G>A was undertaken in an unselected, prospective cohort of 96 individuals treated with irinotecan at a single major UK oncology centre. Data on cytotoxic drugs received, and toxicity for all irinotecan treatment cycles were collected from case notes. Over 95% (92/96) of patients received an intermediate dose of irinotecan (180 mg/m(2), twice weekly). Irinotecan was given in combination with other cytotoxic drugs in 93/96 subjects and Grade 3 or 4 toxicity occurred in 23% of subjects. RESULTS: No association was found between UGT1A1*28 or c.-3156G>A and neutropenia. However, individuals carrying two copies of UGT1A1*28 (p = 0.04; OR: 14; 95% CI: 1.1-185) or c.-3156G>A (p = 0.03) had a significantly increased risk of diarrhea over all cycles. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that UGT1A1 genotyping is not a good predictor of hematological toxicity in patients treated with intermediate irinotecan doses. However, it may be useful in the identification of patients at risk of severe diarrhea.