• Assessment of bladder motion for clinical radiotherapy practice using cine-magnetic resonance imaging.

      McBain, Catherine A; Khoo, Vincent S; Buckley, David L; Sykes, Jonathan S; Green, Melanie M; Cowan, Richard A; Hutchinson, Charles E; Moore, Christopher J; Price, Patricia M; Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Manchester, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, United Kingdom. (2009-11-01)
      PURPOSE: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. RESULTS: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. CONCLUSIONS: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.
    • Bladder preservation multimodality therapy as an alternative to radical cystectomy for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer.

      Choudhury, Ananya; Cowan, Richard A; The Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (2011-11)
    • European genome-wide association study identifies SLC14A1 as a new urinary bladder cancer susceptibility gene.

      Rafnar, T; Vermeulen, S H; Sulem, P; Thorleifsson, G; Aben, Katja K H; Witjes, J A; Grotenhuis, A J; Verhaegh, G W; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C A; Besenbacher, S; et al. (2011-11-01)
      Three genome-wide association studies in Europe and the USA have reported eight urinary bladder cancer (UBC) susceptibility loci. Using extended case and control series and 1000 Genomes imputations of 5 340 737 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we searched for additional loci in the European GWAS. The discovery sample set consisted of 1631 cases and 3822 controls from the Netherlands and 603 cases and 37 781 controls from Iceland. For follow-up, we used 3790 cases and 7507 controls from 13 sample sets of European and Iranian ancestry. Based on the discovery analysis, we followed up signals in the urea transporter (UT) gene SLC14A. The strongest signal at this locus was represented by a SNP in intron 3, rs17674580, that reached genome-wide significance in the overall analysis of the discovery and follow-up groups: odds ratio = 1.17, P = 7.6 × 10(-11). SLC14A1 codes for UTs that define the Kidd blood group and are crucial for the maintenance of a constant urea concentration gradient in the renal medulla and, through this, the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. It is speculated that rs17674580, or other sequence variants in LD with it, indirectly modifies UBC risk by affecting urine production. If confirmed, this would support the 'urogenous contact hypothesis' that urine production and voiding frequency modify the risk of UBC.
    • MRE11 expression is predictive of cause-specific survival following radical radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

      Choudhury, Ananya; Nelson, L D; Teo, M T W; Chilka, S; Bhattarai, S; Johnston, C F; Elliott, F; Lowery, J; Taylor, C F; Churchman, M; et al. (2010-09-15)
      Radical radiotherapy and surgery achieve similar cure rates in muscle-invasive bladder cancer, but the choice of which treatment would be most beneficial cannot currently be predicted for individual patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether expression of any of a panel of DNA damage signaling proteins in tumor samples taken before irradiation could be used as a predictive marker of radiotherapy response, or rather was prognostic. Protein expression of MRE11, RAD50, NBS1, ATM, and H2AX was studied by immunohistochemistry in pretreatment tumor specimens from two cohorts of bladder cancer patients (validation cohort prospectively acquired) treated with radical radiotherapy and one cohort of cystectomy patients. In the radiotherapy test cohort (n = 86), low tumor MRE11 expression was associated with worse cancer-specific survival compared with high expression [43.1% versus 68.7% 3-year cause-specific survival (CSS), P = 0.012] by Kaplan-Meier analysis. This was confirmed in the radiotherapy validation cohort (n = 93; 43.0% versus 71.2%, P = 0.020). However, in the cystectomy cohort (n = 88), MRE11 expression was not associated with cancer-specific survival, commensurate with MRE11 being a predictive marker. High MRE11 expression in the combined radiotherapy cohort had a significantly better cancer-specific survival compared with the high-expression cystectomy cohort (69.9% versus 53.8% 3-year CSS, P = 0.021). In this validated immunohistochemistry study, MRE11 protein expression was shown and confirmed as a predictive factor associated with survival following bladder cancer radiotherapy, justifying its inclusion in subsequent trial designs. MRE11 expression may ultimately allow patient selection for radiotherapy or cystectomy, thus improving overall cure rates.