• Assessing the effect of a contouring protocol on postprostatectomy radiotherapy clinical target volumes and interphysician variation.

      Mitchell, Darren M; Perry, Lesley A; Smith, Steve; Elliott, Tony; Wylie, James P; Cowan, Richard A; Livsey, Jacqueline E; Logue, John P; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom. dmmitchell@doctors.org.uk (2009-11-15)
      PURPOSE: To compare postprostatectomy clinical target volume (CTV) delineation before and after the introduction of a contouring protocol and to investigate its effect on interphysician variability METHODS AND MATERIALS: Six site-specialized radiation oncologists independently delineated a CTV on the computed tomography (CT) scans of 3 patients who had received postprostatectomy radiotherapy. At least 3 weeks later this was repeated, but with the physicians adhering to the contouring protocol from the Medical Research Council's Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trial. The volumes obtained before and after the protocol were compared and the effect of the protocol on interphysician variability assessed. RESULTS: An increase in mean CTV for all patients of 40.7 to 53.9 cm(3) was noted as a result of observing the protocol, with individual increases in the mean CTV of 65%, 15%, and 24% for Patients 1, 2, and 3 respectively. A reduction in interphysician variability was noted when the protocol was used. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial interphysician variation in target volume delineation for postprostatectomy radiotherapy exists, which can be reduced by the use of a contouring protocol. The RADICALS contouring protocol increases the target volumes when compared with those volumes typically applied at our center. The effect of treating larger volumes on the therapeutic ratio and resultant toxicity should be carefully monitored, particularly if the same dose-response as documented in radical prostate radiotherapy applies to the adjuvant and salvage setting. Prostate cancer, Postprostatectomy, Radiotherapy, Target volume.
    • Benign schwannoma in paranasal sinuses: a clinico-pathological study of five cases, emphasising diagnostic difficulties.

      Sheikh, Hamid Y; Chakravarthy, R P; Slevin, Nicholas J; Sykes, Andrew J; Banerjee, Saumitra S; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. hamid.sheikh@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk (2008-06)
      OBJECTIVES: To highlight the difficulty in making a correct diagnosis of benign schwannoma in the paranasal region, to raise awareness of this rare condition, and to suggest the most appropriate treatment. METHOD: Retrieval of cases retrospectively from archives of the histopathology department of a major UK cancer centre with central review of all cases. RESULTS: Five cases were identified since 1990 and clinical and pathological features are summarised. Median follow up of patients was 8.1 years. Radiological appearances of local bone invasion and histological features of tumour unencapsulation and hypercellularity could give the mistaken impression of malignant disease and lead to unnecessary over-treatment. CONCLUSION: Central pathological review and clinical awareness is required. Although local recurrence can occur, the prognosis is excellent. The treatment of choice is local excision. Radiotherapy can be considered, but in most cases it would incur unnecessary morbidity.
    • Case of rhabdomyosarcoma presenting with myasthenia gravis.

      Mehmood, Qurrat U; Shaktawat, S S; Parikh, O; The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Rd, Manchester, M20 4BX, United Kingdom. (2011-08-01)
    • Inter-fraction motion and dosimetric consequences during breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

      Jain, Pooja; Marchant, Thomas E; Green, Melanie M; Watkins, Gillian R; Davies, Julie; McCarthy, Claire; Loncaster, Juliette A; Stewart, Alan L; Magee, Brian; Moore, Christopher J; et al. (2009-01)
      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can improve dose homogeneity within the breast planned target volume (PTV), but may be more susceptible to patient/organ motion than standard tangential radiotherapy (RT). We used daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging to assess inter-fraction motion during breast IMRT and its subsequent impact on IMRT and standard RT dose homogeneity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten breast cancer patients selected for IMRT were studied. CBCT images were acquired immediately after daily treatment. Automatic image co-registration was used to determine patient positioning variations. Daily PTV contours were used to calculate PTV variations and daily delivered IMRT and theoretically planned tangential RT dose. RESULTS: Group systematic (and random) setup errors detected by CBCT were 5.7 (3.9)mm laterally, 2.8 (3.5)mm vertically and 2.3 (3.2)mm longitudinally. Rotations >2 degrees in any axis occurred on 53/106 (50%) occasions. Daily PTV volume varied up to 23%. IMRT dose homogeneity was superior at planning and throughout the treatment compared with standard RT (1.8% vs. 15.8% PTV received >105% planned mean dose), despite increased motion sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: CBCT revealed inadequacies of current patient positioning and verification procedures during breast RT and confirmed improved dose homogeneity using IMRT for the patients studied.
    • A novel imaging technique for fusion of high-quality immobilised MR images of the head and neck with CT scans for radiotherapy target delineation.

      Webster, Gareth J; Kilgallon, J E; Ho, Kean F; Rowbottom, Carl G; Slevin, Nicholas J; Mackay, Ranald I; North Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. gareth.webster@physics.cr.man.ac.uk (2009-06)
      Uncertainty and inconsistency are observed in target volume delineation in the head and neck for radiotherapy treatment planning based only on CT imaging. Alternative modalities such as MRI have previously been incorporated into the delineation process to provide additional anatomical information. This work aims to improve on previous studies by combining good image quality with precise patient immobilisation in order to maintain patient position between scans. MR images were acquired using quadrature coils placed over the head and neck while the patient was immobilised in the treatment position using a five-point thermoplastic shell. The MR image and CT images were automatically fused in the Pinnacle treatment planning system using Syntegra software. Image quality, distortion and accuracy of the image registration using patient anatomy were evaluated. Image quality was found to be superior to that acquired using the body coil, while distortion was < 1.0 mm to a radius of 8.7 cm from the scan centre. Image registration accuracy was found to be 2.2 mm (+/- 0.9 mm) and < 3.0 degrees (n = 6). A novel MRI technique that combines good image quality with patient immobilization has been developed and is now in clinical use. The scan duration of approximately 15 min has been well tolerated by all patients.
    • Phase II study of cisplatin and imatinib in advanced salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

      Ghosal, N; Mais, Kathleen L; Shenjere, Patrick; Julyan, Peter J; Hastings, David L; Ward, Timothy H; Ryder, W David J; Bruce, I; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; et al. (2011-10)
      Patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands show over-expression of KIT in a high proportion of cases. Options for systemic treatment are limited in locally advanced and metastatic disease. We explored the efficacy of imatinib and cisplatin combined in this group of patients. A Gehan's two-stage, phase II trial was conducted on 28 patients. Those with progressive, locally advanced, and metastatic disease with an over-expression of KIT were treated with single agent imatinib 800 mg daily for two months, followed by a combination of imatinib 400mg daily and cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) at four-weekly intervals for six cycles. This was followed by maintenance single agent imatinib 400mg daily until the disease progressed. Response was monitored using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and morphological imaging using computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and chest radiographs (CT/MRI/CXR). Morphological imaging showed partial response in three of 28 patients, and five patients showed a response on FDG-PET. In addition, 19 patients had useful stabilisation of disease. The median time to progression and overall survival was 15 months (range 1-43) and 35 months (range 1-75), respectively. The combination of imatinib and cisplatin was reasonably well tolerated. This combination may provide stabilisation in locally advanced and metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.
    • Radiotherapy for the treatment of longstanding head and neck hemangioma.

      Douglas, Catriona Mairi; Ho, Kean F; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. Catriona.douglas@christie.nhs.uk (2009-08)
    • Testicular seminoma with mediastinal lymphadenopathy -- a diagnostic pitfall.

      Jegannathen, Apurna; Taylor, Malcolm B; Jones, M; Logue, John P; Departments of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. (2009-05)
      Relapse following adjuvant paraaortic radiation therapy in patients with Stage I seminoma is rare, occurring in approximately 4% of men. The majority of relapses are sited in the pelvis but relapse in the mediastinum is also recognised. As such, radiological imaging using chest radiographs remains commonplace in follow-up. However, there are reports of the association of testicular cancers with sarcoidosis and sarcoid-like processes in the mediastinum, emphasising the importance of making histological diagnosis prior to commencement of any treatment. We report on two men treated for testicular seminoma who on follow-up developed mediastinal lymphadenopathy, which was initially assumed to be metastatic seminoma. Both patients underwent mediastinascopy and biopsy prior to commencement of anti-cancer therapy. In both cases, the biopsies showed sarcoidosis, and unnecessary anti-cancer treatment was avoided.