• Cribriform-morular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma: molecular characterization of a case with neuroendocrine differentiation and aggressive behavior.

      Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Menasce, Lia P; Yap, Beng K; Colaco, Rovel J; Castro, Patricia; Celestino, Ricardo; Ruíz-Ponte, Clara; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Department of Pathology, Clinical University Hospital, Galician Health Service, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. (2009-01)
      We describe an especially aggressive case of cribriform-morular variant (C-MV) of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) in a 42-year-old man with familial adenomatous polyposis who died with lung and brain metastases 17 months after thyroidectomy. The angioinvasive neoplasm combined a mixture of trabecular, solid, cribriform, and follicular patterns of growth with CD10+ morules. Follicles were devoid of colloid, and the nuclear features typical of PTC were present in some areas and missing in others. Tumor cells were positive for thyroid transcription factor-1 and, in 40% of the tumoral mass, also were positive for chromogranin and synaptophysin and were negative for thyroglobulin and calcitonin. Strong nuclear staining for beta-catenin was found in all tumor cells, as was positivity for p53 and cyclin D1. In addition to the germline heterozygous APC Ex 2-3 duplication mutation, a somatic homozygous silent p. Thr1493Thr gene variant was found in the neoplastic cells along with RET/PTC rearrangement. This tumor represents the first case of C-MV of PTC showing neuroendocrine differentiation.
    • Evidence for extrathyroidal formation of 3-iodothyronamine in humans as provided by a novel monoclonal antibody-based chemiluminescent serum immunoassay.

      Hoefig, C S; Köhrle, J; Brabant, Georg E; Dixit, Kashinath C S; Yap, Beng K; Strasburger, C J; Wu, Z; Institut für Experimentelle Endokrinologie, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. (2011-06)
      Thyronamines are thyronergic metabolites of thyroid hormones. Lack of reliable and sensitive detection methods for endogenous 3-iodothyronamine (3-T(1)AM) has so far hampered progress in understanding their physiological action and role in endocrine homeostasis or pathophysiology of diseases.
    • Patterns of relapse following radiotherapy for differentiated thyroid cancer: implication for target volume delineation.

      Azrif, Muhammad; Slevin, Nicholas J; Sykes, Andrew J; Swindell, Ric; Yap, Beng K; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom. (2008-10)
      INTRODUCTION: Post-operative residual disease in differentiated thyroid cancer is an indication for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) especially if there is poor radioiodine uptake by the residual disease. There are no standardized guidelines or consensus in target delineation for radiotherapy in thyroid cancer. AIMS: To determine the pattern of recurrence in patients with well differentiated thyroid cancer who received adjuvant or definitive radiotherapy as well as radioiodine ablation following surgery or biopsy with a view to better defining future target volume delineation for radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-nine patients with differentiated thyroid cancer received radical external beam radiotherapy and radioiodine ablation (3.5GBq) following thyroidectomy or biopsy between 1990 and 2000. Nineteen patients had macroscopic residual (11) or inoperable disease (8), whilst 30 patients had clear (5) or microscopic positive resection margin (24), and 1 patient the resection margin status was unknown. All the patients were deemed high risk for local recurrence or progressive disease. The thyroid bed and regional nodes were irradiated using two radiotherapy techniques: (1) non co-planar lateral fields (NCLF) in coronal plane using 6MV photons to a dose of 45-50Gy in 16 fractions over 22 days and (2) anterior-posterior parallel pair of 6MV photons to a dose of 40-42.5Gy in 16 fractions over 22 days. There was no attempt to irradiate the lymph nodes in that part of the anterior and posterior mediastinum extending from the brachiocephalic veins to the carina. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 5.4 years (range 0.9-12.4 years). The actuarial 5-year cause-specific survival and local control for the whole group was 75.7% and 81.4%, respectively. Of the 4 patients with mediastinal recurrence, all had neck recurrences and two had distant metastases. All the medisastinal recurrences occurred in superior mediastinum (level VII) and all were treated with NCLF in coronal plane radiotherapy technique. Furthermore, mediastinal recurrences did not occur in isolation. The 5-years loco-regional control rate was 89.1% for those with clear or microscopic positive margins and 69.2% for those with macroscopic residual or inoperable disease. Five-year cause specific survival was 58.3% for patients with macroscopic residual or inoperable disease and 91.4% for those with clear or microscopic positive margins. CONCLUSION: The status of postoperative margin relating to bulk of disease influences local control and cause specific survival. Surgical resection in locally advanced thyroid cancer should be performed by an experienced surgeon to achieve macroscopic clearance where possible. The majority of recurrences were loco-regional. The few superior mediastinal recurrences did not occur in isolation. All the mediastinal recurrences occurred in the superior mediastinum (level VII). We recommend the target volume should encompass the thyroid bed and regional neck nodes and the superior mediastinum level VII excluding the lymph nodes on both sides of the trachea within the anterior and posterior mediastinum extending from the brachiocephalic veins to the carina (compartment 4). Thus, this should facilitate dose escalation to improve loco-regional control and avoiding radiation induced mediastinal toxicity.