• Assessing the effect of a contouring protocol on postprostatectomy radiotherapy clinical target volumes and interphysician variation.

      Mitchell, Darren M; Perry, Lesley A; Smith, Steve; Elliott, Tony; Wylie, James P; Cowan, Richard A; Livsey, Jacqueline E; Logue, John P; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom. dmmitchell@doctors.org.uk (2009-11-15)
      PURPOSE: To compare postprostatectomy clinical target volume (CTV) delineation before and after the introduction of a contouring protocol and to investigate its effect on interphysician variability METHODS AND MATERIALS: Six site-specialized radiation oncologists independently delineated a CTV on the computed tomography (CT) scans of 3 patients who had received postprostatectomy radiotherapy. At least 3 weeks later this was repeated, but with the physicians adhering to the contouring protocol from the Medical Research Council's Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trial. The volumes obtained before and after the protocol were compared and the effect of the protocol on interphysician variability assessed. RESULTS: An increase in mean CTV for all patients of 40.7 to 53.9 cm(3) was noted as a result of observing the protocol, with individual increases in the mean CTV of 65%, 15%, and 24% for Patients 1, 2, and 3 respectively. A reduction in interphysician variability was noted when the protocol was used. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial interphysician variation in target volume delineation for postprostatectomy radiotherapy exists, which can be reduced by the use of a contouring protocol. The RADICALS contouring protocol increases the target volumes when compared with those volumes typically applied at our center. The effect of treating larger volumes on the therapeutic ratio and resultant toxicity should be carefully monitored, particularly if the same dose-response as documented in radical prostate radiotherapy applies to the adjuvant and salvage setting. Prostate cancer, Postprostatectomy, Radiotherapy, Target volume.
    • Endometrial adenocarcinoma: an analysis of treatment and outcome.

      Byrd, Louise M; Swindell, Ric; Webber-Rookes, Daniel; Hannon, Robert; Hunter, Robin D; Livsey, Jacqueline E; Davidson, Susan E; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St Mary's Hospital for Women and Children, Manchester, UK. louise.byrd@cmmc.nhs.uk (2008-11)
      This study aims to review the survival and morbidity in patients treated for endometrial cancer, at a single centre and analyses the effects of co-morbidity on these outcomes. Case notes of all patients referred to the Christie Hospital with endometrial carcinoma from January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1995 (n=499) were reviewed. Twenty patients presented with recurrence and were not included in this analysis. Three hundred and seventy-five patients had previously undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy (+/- pelvic lymphadenectomy). Of these, 175 received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (XRT) only, 49 received XRT and brachytherapy, 30 received brachytherapy alone and 121 patients had no further therapy. One hundred and four patients were referred for primary treatment. Radical radiotherapy was administered to 63 patients who were unfit for surgery, with 10 of these receiving XRT + brachytherapy and 53 receiving brachytherapy alone. Thirteen patients received palliative XRT and 28 supportive care only. The overall 5-year survival for those treated radically was 73.3%. There was no significant survival difference between patients who underwent surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy, in whatever form (p=0.115). Patients who did not undergo surgery did less well as a group, although there was no significant survival difference between those treated with combination therapy or brachytherapy alone (p=0.33). Survival was significantly associated with FIGO stage, tumour grade, age (especially those >75 years) and co-morbidity (ACE-27 score). Late morbidity occurred in 46 patients, with severe toxicity affecting 12 (3.8%). Toxicity was associated with ACE-27 score (p=0.0019), treatment dose and modality, with 50% (n=6) of severe toxicity seen in patients receiving adjuvant XRT + ICT. These data demonstrate that survival in patients with endometrial carcinoma treated radically remains good, with the stage and grade of tumour being significant factors for overall survival. The incidence of severe morbidity related to radiotherapy of any modality was 3.8%. A high co-morbidity (ACE-27) score was significantly associated with poorer survival (p<0.0055) and increased late treatment morbidity (p=0.0019).
    • Irinotecan+5-fluorouracil with concomitant pre-operative radiotherapy in locally advanced non-resectable rectal cancer: a phase I/II study.

      Iles, S M; Gollins, Simon W; Susnerwala, Shabbir; Haylock, B; Myint, A Sun; Biswas, A; Swindell, Ric; Levine, Edward; Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2008-04-08)
      In the UK, 10% of patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have inoperable disease at presentation. This study ascertained whether the resectability rate of inoperable locally advanced rectal cancer was improved by administration of intravenous irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and pelvic radiotherapy. During phase I of the trial (n=12), the dose of irinotecan was escalated in three-patient cohorts from 50 mg m(-2) to 60 mg m(-2) to 70 mg m(-2) to identify the maximum tolerated dose (60 mg m(-2)). In phase II, 31 patients with non-resectable disease received 45 Gy radiotherapy and 5-FU infusions (200 mg m(-2) per day) for 5 weeks. Irinotecan (60 mg m(-2)) was given on days 1, 8, 15 and 22. After treatment, patients were operated on if possible. Thirty patients completed the protocol, 28 underwent surgery. Before surgery, MRI restaging of 24 patients showed that 19 (79%) had a reduction in tumour stage after treatment (seven complete clinical response and 12 partial). Of 27 patients followed up after surgery, 22 (81%) had clear circumferential resection margins. Disease-free and overall survival estimates at 3 years were 65 and 90%, respectively. The regimen was well tolerated. Irinotecan, 5-FU and radiotherapy results in tumour downgrading, allowing resection of previously inoperable tumour with acceptable toxicity.
    • Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan in magnetic resonance imaging-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: impact on long-term clinical outcomes.

      Gollins, S; Sun Myint, A; Haylock, Brian; Wise, M; Saunders, Mark P; Neupane, R; Essapen, S; Samuel, L; Dougal, Mark; Lloyd, A; et al. (2011-03-10)
      To assess long-term clinical outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma using concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine.