• Primary Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Retromolar Trigone; A Useful Alternative to Surgery.

      Bayman, Neil A; Sykes, Andrew J; Bonington, Suzanne C; Blackburn, T; Patel, M; Swindell, Ric; Slevin, Nicholas J; Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. (2009-12-03)
      AIMS: Squamous cell carcinoma of the retromolar trigone is uncommon. The standard initial treatment is primary surgery, which usually involves microvascular reconstruction with a composite flap. Some patients are considered unsuitable for this procedure. This retrospective study examined the outcome and toxicity for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the retromolar trigone treated with definitive radiotherapy in a single centre. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1991 and 2000, 43 patients were treated with definitive radiotherapy with a median dose of 50Gy in 16 fractions over 21 days. Hospital case notes and radiotherapy records were analysed. RESULTS: The median age was 66 years (range 39-84 years). Nodal disease was evident in 13 (30.2%) patients. Twenty-one patients (51.2%) had stage I/II disease and 20 patients (48.8%) had stage III/IV disease. After a median follow-up of 59 months, 13 (30.2%) patients were alive and well, nine (20.9%) patients had died of an intercurrent illness and 21 (48.8%) had died of their disease. Five-year locoregional control was 46.5% (95% confidence interval 29.7-61.7), cause-specific survival was 45.7% (95% confidence interval 29.1-60.8) and overall survival was 30.9% (95% confidence interval 17.5-46.3). Osteoradionecrosis was documented in two patients. DISCUSSION: This hypofractionated regimen is convenient for this patient population and produced comparable outcomes to longer fractionation schedules without an increase in late toxicity.
    • The UK national breast cancer screening programme for survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma detects breast cancer at an early stage.

      Howell, Sacha J; Searle, C; Goode, Valerie; Gardener, T; Linton, Kim M; Cowan, Richard A; Harris, Maggie A; Hopwood, Penelope; Swindell, Ric; Norman, Alison; et al. (2009-08-18)
      BACKGROUND: Supradiaphragmatic radiotherapy (SRT) to treat Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) at a young age increases the risk of breast cancer (BC). A national notification risk assessment and screening programme (NRASP) for women who were treated with SRT before the age of 36 years was instituted in the United Kingdom in 2003. In this study, we report the implementation and screening results from the largest English Cancer Network. METHODS: A total of 417 eligible women were identified through cancer registry/hospital databases and from follow-up (FU) clinics. Screening results were collated retrospectively, and registry searches were used to capture BC cases. RESULTS: Of the 417 women invited for clinical review, 243 (58%) attended. Of these 417 women, 23 (5.5%) have been diagnosed with BC, a standardised incidence ratio of 2.9 compared with the age-matched general population. Of five invasive BCs diagnosed within the NRASP, none involved axillary lymph nodes compared with 7 of 13 (54%) diagnosed outside the programme (P<0.10). The mean latency for BC cases was 19.5+/-8.35 years and the mean FU duration for those unaffected by BC was 14.6+/-9.11 years (P<0.01), suggesting that those unaffected by BC remain at high risk. Recall and negative biopsy rates were acceptable (10.5 and 0.8%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The NRASP appears to detect BC at an early stage with acceptable biopsy rates, although numbers are small. Determination of NRASP results on a national basis is required for the accurate evaluation of screening efficacy in women previously treated with SRT.