• Capecitabine, bevacizumab, and mitomycin in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: results of the Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group Randomized Phase III MAX Study.

      Tebbutt, Niall C; Wilson, Kate; Gebski, Val; Cummins, Michelle M; Zannino, Diana; Van Hazel, Guy A; Robinson, Bridget; Broad, Adam; Ganju, Vinod; Ackland, Stephen P; et al. (2010-07-01)
      PURPOSE: To determine whether adding bevacizumab, with or without mitomycin, to capecitabine monotherapy improves progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in an open-label, three-arm randomized trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Overall, 471 patients in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom with previously untreated, unresectable mCRC were randomly assigned to the following: capecitabine; capecitabine plus bevacizumab (CB); or capecitabine, bevacizumab, and mitomycin (CBM). We compared CB with capecitabine and CBM with capecitabine for progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), toxicity, response rate (RR), and quality of life (QOL). RESULTS: Median PFS was 5.7 months for capecitabine, 8.5 months for CB, and 8.4 months for CBM (capecitabine v CB: hazard ratio [HR], 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.79; P < .001; C v CBM: HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.75; P < .001). After a median follow-up of 31 months, median OS was 18.9 months for capecitabine and was 16.4 months for CBM; these data were not significantly different. Toxicity rates were acceptable, and all treatment regimens well tolerated. Bevacizumab toxicities were similar to those in previous studies. Measures of overall QOL were similar in all groups. CONCLUSION: Adding bevacizumab to capecitabine, with or without mitomycin, significantly improves PFS without major additional toxicity or impairment of QOL.
    • EXTRA--a multicenter phase II study of chemoradiation using a 5 day per week oral regimen of capecitabine and intravenous mitomycin C in anal cancer.

      Glynne-Jones, Rob; Meadows, Helen; Wan, Susan; Gollins, Simon W; Leslie, Martin; Levine, Edward; McDonald, Alec C; Myint, A Sun; Samuel, Les; Sebag-Montefiore, David; et al. (2008-09-01)
      PURPOSE: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with epidermoid anal carcinoma. Clinical trials in other cancers have confirmed 5-FU can successfully be replaced by the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine. This phase II trial aimed to determine the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of capecitabine, MMC and radiotherapy (RT) in anal cancer patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT) II trial (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy). With MMC (12 mg/m2) on Day 1 and capecitabine on each RT treatment day in two divided doses (825 mg/m2 b.i.d). The endpoints were complete response at 4 weeks, local control at 6 months and toxicity. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients entered the trial. The median age was 61 years (range 45-86) with 14 males and 17 females. Compliance with chemotherapy with no dose interruptions or delays was 68%, and with RT was 81%. Eighteen (58%) patients completed both modalities of treatment as planned. Dose-limiting Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea was seen in 1 of 31 patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3 neutropenia. There were no treatment-related deaths. Four weeks following completion of chemoradiation, 24 patients (77%) had a complete clinical response, and 4 (16%) a partial response. With a median follow-up of 14 months, three locoregional relapses occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Capecitabine with MMC and RT in with patients anal carcinoma is well tolerated, with minimal toxicity and acceptable compliance. We recommend testing this schedule in future national Phase III studies in anal cancer.
    • A phase II study evaluating the use of concurrent mitomycin C and capecitabine in patients with advanced unresectable pseudomyxoma peritonei.

      Farquharson, Adam L; Pranesh, Nagarajan; Witham, Gary; Swindell, Ric; Taylor, Malcolm B; Renehan, Andrew G; Rout, Shantanu; Wilson, Malcolm S; O'Dwyer, Sarah T; Saunders, Mark P; et al. (2008-08-19)
      Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare neoplastic process characterised by progressive intra-abdominal dissemination of mucinous tumour, and generally considered resistant to systemic chemotherapy. A phase II study in patients with advanced unresectable PMP was undertaken to evaluate the combination of systemic concurrent mitomycin C (7 mg m(-2) i.v. on day 1) and capecitabine (1250 mg m(-2) b.d. on days 1-14) in a 3-weekly cycle (MCap). Response was determined by semiquantitative assessment of disease volume on serial computed tomographic (CT) scans and serum tumour marker (CEA, CA125, CA19-9) changes at 12 weeks. Between 2003 and 2006, 40 patients were recruited through a national centre for the treatment of peritoneal surface tumours. At baseline, 23 patients had progressive disease and 17 had stable disease. Of 39 assessable patients, 15 (38%, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 25, 54%) benefited from chemotherapy in the form of either reductions in mucinous deposition or stabilisation of progressive pretreatment disease determined on CT scan. Notably, two patients, originally considered unresectable, following MCap and re-staging underwent potentially curative cytoreductive surgery. Grade 3/4 toxicity rates were low (6%, 95% CIs: 4, 9%). Twenty out of 29 assessed patients (69%, 95% CIs: 51, 83%) felt that their Global Health Status improved during chemotherapy. This is the first trial to demonstrate an apparent benefit of systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced unresectable PMP.