• A novel imaging technique for fusion of high-quality immobilised MR images of the head and neck with CT scans for radiotherapy target delineation.

      Webster, Gareth J; Kilgallon, J E; Ho, Kean F; Rowbottom, Carl G; Slevin, Nicholas J; Mackay, Ranald I; North Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. gareth.webster@physics.cr.man.ac.uk (2009-06)
      Uncertainty and inconsistency are observed in target volume delineation in the head and neck for radiotherapy treatment planning based only on CT imaging. Alternative modalities such as MRI have previously been incorporated into the delineation process to provide additional anatomical information. This work aims to improve on previous studies by combining good image quality with precise patient immobilisation in order to maintain patient position between scans. MR images were acquired using quadrature coils placed over the head and neck while the patient was immobilised in the treatment position using a five-point thermoplastic shell. The MR image and CT images were automatically fused in the Pinnacle treatment planning system using Syntegra software. Image quality, distortion and accuracy of the image registration using patient anatomy were evaluated. Image quality was found to be superior to that acquired using the body coil, while distortion was < 1.0 mm to a radius of 8.7 cm from the scan centre. Image registration accuracy was found to be 2.2 mm (+/- 0.9 mm) and < 3.0 degrees (n = 6). A novel MRI technique that combines good image quality with patient immobilization has been developed and is now in clinical use. The scan duration of approximately 15 min has been well tolerated by all patients.
    • Phase II study of cisplatin and imatinib in advanced salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

      Ghosal, N; Mais, Kathleen L; Shenjere, Patrick; Julyan, Peter J; Hastings, David L; Ward, Timothy H; Ryder, W David J; Bruce, I; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; et al. (2011-10)
      Patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands show over-expression of KIT in a high proportion of cases. Options for systemic treatment are limited in locally advanced and metastatic disease. We explored the efficacy of imatinib and cisplatin combined in this group of patients. A Gehan's two-stage, phase II trial was conducted on 28 patients. Those with progressive, locally advanced, and metastatic disease with an over-expression of KIT were treated with single agent imatinib 800 mg daily for two months, followed by a combination of imatinib 400mg daily and cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) at four-weekly intervals for six cycles. This was followed by maintenance single agent imatinib 400mg daily until the disease progressed. Response was monitored using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and morphological imaging using computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and chest radiographs (CT/MRI/CXR). Morphological imaging showed partial response in three of 28 patients, and five patients showed a response on FDG-PET. In addition, 19 patients had useful stabilisation of disease. The median time to progression and overall survival was 15 months (range 1-43) and 35 months (range 1-75), respectively. The combination of imatinib and cisplatin was reasonably well tolerated. This combination may provide stabilisation in locally advanced and metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.
    • Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan in magnetic resonance imaging-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: impact on long-term clinical outcomes.

      Gollins, S; Sun Myint, A; Haylock, Brian; Wise, M; Saunders, Mark P; Neupane, R; Essapen, S; Samuel, L; Dougal, Mark; Lloyd, A; et al. (2011-03-10)
      To assess long-term clinical outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma using concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine.
    • Preoperative downstaging chemoradiation with concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine in MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: a phase I trial (NWCOG-2).

      Gollins, Simon W; Myint, S; Susnerwala, S; Haylock, B; Wise, M; Topham, C; Samuel, L; Swindell, Ric; Morris, J; Mason, L; et al. (2009-09-15)
      BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of neoadjuvant chemoradiation using radiotherapy (RT) combined with concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan for locally advanced rectal cancer before surgery. METHODS: Forty-six patients were recruited and treated on the basis that MRI scanning had shown poor-risk tumours with threatening (< or =1 mm) or involvement of the mesorectal fascia. Conformal RT was given using 3 or 4 fields at daily fractions of 1.8 Gy on 5 days per week to a total dose of 45 Gy. Concurrently oral capecitabine was given twice daily throughout radiotherapy continuously from days 1 to 35 and intravenous irinotecan was given once per week during weeks 1 to 4 of RT. Dose levels were gradually escalated as follows. Dose level 1: capecitabine 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 50 mg m(-2); Dose level 2: capecitabine 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 60 mg m(-2); Dose level 3: capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 60 mg m(2); Dose level 4: capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 70 mg m(-2). RESULTS: Diarrhoea (grade 3, no grade 4) was the main serious acute toxicity with lesser degrees of fatigue, neutropenia, anorexia and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. The recommended dose for future study was dose level 2 at which 3 of 14 patients (21%) developed grade 3 diarrhoea. Postoperative complications included seven pelvic or wound infections and two anastomotic and two perineal wound dehiscences. There were no deaths in the first 30 days postoperatively. Of 41 resected specimens, 11 (27%) showed a pathological complete response (pCR) and five (12%) showed an involved circumferential resection margin (defined as < or =1 mm). The 3-year disease-free survival (intent-to-treat) was 53.2%. CONCLUSION: In patients with poor-risk MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer threatening or involving the mesorectal fascia, preoperative chemoradiation based on RT at 45 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks with continuous daily oral capecitabine at 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. days 1-35 and weekly IV irinotecan at 60 mg m(-2) weeks 1-4, provides acceptable acute toxicity and postoperative morbidity with encouraging response and curative resection rates.