• Effectiveness of a home care nursing program in the symptom management of patients with colorectal and breast cancer receiving oral chemotherapy: a randomized, controlled trial.

      Molassiotis, Alexander; Brearley, Sarah; Saunders, Mark P; Craven, Olive; Wardley, Andrew M; Farrell, Carole; Swindell, Ric; Todd, Chris; Luker, Karen; University of Manchester, School of Nursing, University Place, Manchester, M13 9PL, United Kingdom. alex.molassiotis@manchester.ac.uk (2009-12-20)
      PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness of a symptom-focused home care program in patients with cancer who were receiving oral chemotherapy in relation to toxicity levels, anxiety, depression, quality of life, and service utilization. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A randomized, controlled trial was carried out with 164 patients with a diagnosis of colorectal (n = 110) and breast (n = 54) cancers who were receiving oral capecitabine. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either a home care program by a nurse or standard care for 18 weeks (ie, six cycles of chemotherapy). Toxicity assessments were carried out weekly for the duration of the patients' participation in the trial, and validated self-report tools assessed anxiety, depression, and quality of life. RESULTS: Significant improvements were observed in the home care group in relation to the symptoms of oral mucositis, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, pain, fatigue (first four cycles), and insomnia (all P < .05). This improvement was most significant during the initial two cycles. Unplanned service utilization, particularly the number of inpatient days (57 v 167 days; P = .02), also was lower in the home care group. CONCLUSION: A symptom-focused home care program was able to assist patients to manage their treatment adverse effects more effectively than standard care. It is imperative that patients receiving oral chemotherapy are supported with such programs, particularly during initial treatment cycles, to improve their treatment and symptom experiences.
    • EXTRA--a multicenter phase II study of chemoradiation using a 5 day per week oral regimen of capecitabine and intravenous mitomycin C in anal cancer.

      Glynne-Jones, Rob; Meadows, Helen; Wan, Susan; Gollins, Simon W; Leslie, Martin; Levine, Edward; McDonald, Alec C; Myint, A Sun; Samuel, Les; Sebag-Montefiore, David; et al. (2008-09-01)
      PURPOSE: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with epidermoid anal carcinoma. Clinical trials in other cancers have confirmed 5-FU can successfully be replaced by the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine. This phase II trial aimed to determine the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of capecitabine, MMC and radiotherapy (RT) in anal cancer patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT) II trial (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy). With MMC (12 mg/m2) on Day 1 and capecitabine on each RT treatment day in two divided doses (825 mg/m2 b.i.d). The endpoints were complete response at 4 weeks, local control at 6 months and toxicity. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients entered the trial. The median age was 61 years (range 45-86) with 14 males and 17 females. Compliance with chemotherapy with no dose interruptions or delays was 68%, and with RT was 81%. Eighteen (58%) patients completed both modalities of treatment as planned. Dose-limiting Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea was seen in 1 of 31 patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3 neutropenia. There were no treatment-related deaths. Four weeks following completion of chemoradiation, 24 patients (77%) had a complete clinical response, and 4 (16%) a partial response. With a median follow-up of 14 months, three locoregional relapses occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Capecitabine with MMC and RT in with patients anal carcinoma is well tolerated, with minimal toxicity and acceptable compliance. We recommend testing this schedule in future national Phase III studies in anal cancer.
    • Irinotecan+5-fluorouracil with concomitant pre-operative radiotherapy in locally advanced non-resectable rectal cancer: a phase I/II study.

      Iles, S M; Gollins, Simon W; Susnerwala, Shabbir; Haylock, B; Myint, A Sun; Biswas, A; Swindell, Ric; Levine, Edward; Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2008-04-08)
      In the UK, 10% of patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have inoperable disease at presentation. This study ascertained whether the resectability rate of inoperable locally advanced rectal cancer was improved by administration of intravenous irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and pelvic radiotherapy. During phase I of the trial (n=12), the dose of irinotecan was escalated in three-patient cohorts from 50 mg m(-2) to 60 mg m(-2) to 70 mg m(-2) to identify the maximum tolerated dose (60 mg m(-2)). In phase II, 31 patients with non-resectable disease received 45 Gy radiotherapy and 5-FU infusions (200 mg m(-2) per day) for 5 weeks. Irinotecan (60 mg m(-2)) was given on days 1, 8, 15 and 22. After treatment, patients were operated on if possible. Thirty patients completed the protocol, 28 underwent surgery. Before surgery, MRI restaging of 24 patients showed that 19 (79%) had a reduction in tumour stage after treatment (seven complete clinical response and 12 partial). Of 27 patients followed up after surgery, 22 (81%) had clear circumferential resection margins. Disease-free and overall survival estimates at 3 years were 65 and 90%, respectively. The regimen was well tolerated. Irinotecan, 5-FU and radiotherapy results in tumour downgrading, allowing resection of previously inoperable tumour with acceptable toxicity.
    • A phase I study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of the combination of pertuzumab (rhuMab 2C4) and capecitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors.

      Albanell, Joan; Montagut, Clara; Jones, Eileen T; Pronk, Linda; Mellado, Begoña; Beech, Janette; Gascon, Pere; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Brewster, Michael; Saunders, Mark P; et al. (2008-05-01)
      PURPOSE: To study the safety, pharmacokinetics, and recommended dose of the combination of pertuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody HER2-dimerization inhibitor, and capecitabine in patients with advanced malignancies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Patients that had progressed to standard treatment were treated with pertuzumab at a fixed dose of 1,050 mg given i.v. on day 1 plus capecitabine at doses of 825-1,000-1,250 mg/m(2), twice daily orally on days 1 to 14 of each 21-day treatment cycle, in three sequential cohorts. The pharmacokinetics of capecitabine and pertuzumab were studied. Patients received a single dose of capecitabine in a pretreatment phase (day -7) followed by serum sampling for capecitabine and its metabolites. RESULTS: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 were assessable. The combination of capecitabine and pertuzumab was well tolerated at all dose levels and no dose-limiting toxicities were observed. The most frequent adverse event was asthenia, which was grade 3 in two patients. One asymptomatic pulmonary embolism occurred. No other grade 3 or 4 adverse events or cardiac or left ventricular ejection fraction events were reported. There was no apparent change in the pharmacokinetics of capecitabine and its metabolites when combined with pertuzumab. The pharmacokinetics of pertuzumab was apparently not modified when administered with capecitabine. Disease stabilization was observed in 11 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Pertuzumab and capecitabine were well tolerated at all dose levels. Escalation beyond the highest dose level tested was not planned, as this included the recommended doses of monotherapy for both drugs. In conclusion, this combination is ready for phase II testing.
    • A phase II study evaluating the use of concurrent mitomycin C and capecitabine in patients with advanced unresectable pseudomyxoma peritonei.

      Farquharson, Adam L; Pranesh, Nagarajan; Witham, Gary; Swindell, Ric; Taylor, Malcolm B; Renehan, Andrew G; Rout, Shantanu; Wilson, Malcolm S; O'Dwyer, Sarah T; Saunders, Mark P; et al. (2008-08-19)
      Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare neoplastic process characterised by progressive intra-abdominal dissemination of mucinous tumour, and generally considered resistant to systemic chemotherapy. A phase II study in patients with advanced unresectable PMP was undertaken to evaluate the combination of systemic concurrent mitomycin C (7 mg m(-2) i.v. on day 1) and capecitabine (1250 mg m(-2) b.d. on days 1-14) in a 3-weekly cycle (MCap). Response was determined by semiquantitative assessment of disease volume on serial computed tomographic (CT) scans and serum tumour marker (CEA, CA125, CA19-9) changes at 12 weeks. Between 2003 and 2006, 40 patients were recruited through a national centre for the treatment of peritoneal surface tumours. At baseline, 23 patients had progressive disease and 17 had stable disease. Of 39 assessable patients, 15 (38%, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 25, 54%) benefited from chemotherapy in the form of either reductions in mucinous deposition or stabilisation of progressive pretreatment disease determined on CT scan. Notably, two patients, originally considered unresectable, following MCap and re-staging underwent potentially curative cytoreductive surgery. Grade 3/4 toxicity rates were low (6%, 95% CIs: 4, 9%). Twenty out of 29 assessed patients (69%, 95% CIs: 51, 83%) felt that their Global Health Status improved during chemotherapy. This is the first trial to demonstrate an apparent benefit of systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced unresectable PMP.
    • Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan in magnetic resonance imaging-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: impact on long-term clinical outcomes.

      Gollins, S; Sun Myint, A; Haylock, Brian; Wise, M; Saunders, Mark P; Neupane, R; Essapen, S; Samuel, L; Dougal, Mark; Lloyd, A; et al. (2011-03-10)
      To assess long-term clinical outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma using concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine.
    • Preoperative downstaging chemoradiation with concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine in MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: a phase I trial (NWCOG-2).

      Gollins, Simon W; Myint, S; Susnerwala, S; Haylock, B; Wise, M; Topham, C; Samuel, L; Swindell, Ric; Morris, J; Mason, L; et al. (2009-09-15)
      BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of neoadjuvant chemoradiation using radiotherapy (RT) combined with concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan for locally advanced rectal cancer before surgery. METHODS: Forty-six patients were recruited and treated on the basis that MRI scanning had shown poor-risk tumours with threatening (< or =1 mm) or involvement of the mesorectal fascia. Conformal RT was given using 3 or 4 fields at daily fractions of 1.8 Gy on 5 days per week to a total dose of 45 Gy. Concurrently oral capecitabine was given twice daily throughout radiotherapy continuously from days 1 to 35 and intravenous irinotecan was given once per week during weeks 1 to 4 of RT. Dose levels were gradually escalated as follows. Dose level 1: capecitabine 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 50 mg m(-2); Dose level 2: capecitabine 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 60 mg m(-2); Dose level 3: capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 60 mg m(2); Dose level 4: capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 70 mg m(-2). RESULTS: Diarrhoea (grade 3, no grade 4) was the main serious acute toxicity with lesser degrees of fatigue, neutropenia, anorexia and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. The recommended dose for future study was dose level 2 at which 3 of 14 patients (21%) developed grade 3 diarrhoea. Postoperative complications included seven pelvic or wound infections and two anastomotic and two perineal wound dehiscences. There were no deaths in the first 30 days postoperatively. Of 41 resected specimens, 11 (27%) showed a pathological complete response (pCR) and five (12%) showed an involved circumferential resection margin (defined as < or =1 mm). The 3-year disease-free survival (intent-to-treat) was 53.2%. CONCLUSION: In patients with poor-risk MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer threatening or involving the mesorectal fascia, preoperative chemoradiation based on RT at 45 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks with continuous daily oral capecitabine at 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. days 1-35 and weekly IV irinotecan at 60 mg m(-2) weeks 1-4, provides acceptable acute toxicity and postoperative morbidity with encouraging response and curative resection rates.
    • Synchronous chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck using capecitabine: a single-centre, open-label, single-group phase II study.

      Jegannathen, Apurna; Mais, Kathleen L; Sykes, Andrew J; Lee, Lip W; Yap, Beng K; Birzgalis, Andrew R; Homer, Jarrod J; Ryder, W David J; Slevin, Nicholas J; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. (2011-03)
      To evaluate the efficacy of concurrent oral capecitabine with accelerated hypofractionated radical radiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN).