• Effect of epoetin alfa on survival and cancer treatment-related anemia and fatigue in patients receiving radical radiotherapy with curative intent for head and neck cancer.

      Hoskin, Peter J; Robinson, Martin; Slevin, Nicholas J; Morgan, David; Harrington, Kevin; Gaffney, Christopher; Marie Curie Research Wing for Oncology, Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex, UK. peterhoskin@nhs.net (2009-12-01)
      PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of epoetin alfa on local disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer treatment-related anemia and fatigue in patients with head and neck cancer receiving radical radiotherapy with curative intent. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients (N = 301) with hemoglobin (Hb) less than 15 g/dL were randomly assigned in a ratio of 1:1 to receive radiotherapy plus epoetin alfa (10,000 U subcutaneously [SC] three times weekly if baseline Hb was < 12.5 g/dL; 4,000 U SC three times weekly if baseline Hb > or = 12.5 g/dL) or radiotherapy alone. Hb levels were monitored weekly. The primary end point was local DFS, defined as the time from random assignment to local disease recurrence or death. Secondary efficacy end points included OS, local tumor response, and local tumor control. Patients were followed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks postradiotherapy and annually for 5 years. Cancer treatment-related anemia and fatigue were evaluated with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck. Adverse events were recorded up to 12 weeks postradiotherapy. RESULTS: Hb levels increased from baseline with epoetin alfa. The median duration of local DFS was not statistically different between groups (observation, 35.42 months; epoetin alfa, 31.47 months; hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.41). Groups did not significantly differ in DFS, OS, tumor outcomes, or cancer treatment-related anemia or fatigue. No new or unexpected adverse events were observed. CONCLUSION: Addition of epoetin alfa to radical radiotherapy did not affect survival, tumor outcomes, anemia, or fatigue positively or negatively in patients with head and neck cancer.
    • European genome-wide association study identifies SLC14A1 as a new urinary bladder cancer susceptibility gene.

      Rafnar, T; Vermeulen, S H; Sulem, P; Thorleifsson, G; Aben, Katja K H; Witjes, J A; Grotenhuis, A J; Verhaegh, G W; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C A; Besenbacher, S; et al. (2011-11-01)
      Three genome-wide association studies in Europe and the USA have reported eight urinary bladder cancer (UBC) susceptibility loci. Using extended case and control series and 1000 Genomes imputations of 5 340 737 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we searched for additional loci in the European GWAS. The discovery sample set consisted of 1631 cases and 3822 controls from the Netherlands and 603 cases and 37 781 controls from Iceland. For follow-up, we used 3790 cases and 7507 controls from 13 sample sets of European and Iranian ancestry. Based on the discovery analysis, we followed up signals in the urea transporter (UT) gene SLC14A. The strongest signal at this locus was represented by a SNP in intron 3, rs17674580, that reached genome-wide significance in the overall analysis of the discovery and follow-up groups: odds ratio = 1.17, P = 7.6 × 10(-11). SLC14A1 codes for UTs that define the Kidd blood group and are crucial for the maintenance of a constant urea concentration gradient in the renal medulla and, through this, the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. It is speculated that rs17674580, or other sequence variants in LD with it, indirectly modifies UBC risk by affecting urine production. If confirmed, this would support the 'urogenous contact hypothesis' that urine production and voiding frequency modify the risk of UBC.
    • Phase II study of cisplatin and imatinib in advanced salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

      Ghosal, N; Mais, Kathleen L; Shenjere, Patrick; Julyan, Peter J; Hastings, David L; Ward, Timothy H; Ryder, W David J; Bruce, I; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; et al. (2011-10)
      Patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands show over-expression of KIT in a high proportion of cases. Options for systemic treatment are limited in locally advanced and metastatic disease. We explored the efficacy of imatinib and cisplatin combined in this group of patients. A Gehan's two-stage, phase II trial was conducted on 28 patients. Those with progressive, locally advanced, and metastatic disease with an over-expression of KIT were treated with single agent imatinib 800 mg daily for two months, followed by a combination of imatinib 400mg daily and cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) at four-weekly intervals for six cycles. This was followed by maintenance single agent imatinib 400mg daily until the disease progressed. Response was monitored using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and morphological imaging using computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and chest radiographs (CT/MRI/CXR). Morphological imaging showed partial response in three of 28 patients, and five patients showed a response on FDG-PET. In addition, 19 patients had useful stabilisation of disease. The median time to progression and overall survival was 15 months (range 1-43) and 35 months (range 1-75), respectively. The combination of imatinib and cisplatin was reasonably well tolerated. This combination may provide stabilisation in locally advanced and metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.
    • Randomised phase II trial of 4 dose levels of single agent docetaxel in performance status (PS) 2 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): DOC PS2 trial. Manchester lung cancer group.

      Califano, Raffaele; Griffiths, Richard W; Lorigan, Paul C; Ashcroft, Linda; Taylor, Paul; Burt, Paul A; Lee, Lip W; Chittalia, Abbas; Harris, Maggie A; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; et al. (2011-09)
      The role of chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC patients and ECOG PS2 remains controversial. We evaluated 4 doses of 3-weekly docetaxel to identify a less toxic, clinically effective dose.
    • Use of G-CSF during concurrent chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy in patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer safety data from a phase II trial.

      Sheikh, Hamid Y; Colaco, Rovel J; Lorigan, Paul C; Blackhall, Fiona H; Califano, Raffaele; Ashcroft, Linda; Taylor, Paul; Thatcher, Nick; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Dept of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. (2011-10)
      There is paucity of data in the literature regarding the safety of combining granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) during chemo-radiotherapy (CTRT) in lung cancer patients. The ASCO 2006 recommendations advise against use of CSFs during concomitant mediastinal CTRT. The only randomised study evaluating CSFs in this context showed significant increase in grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia and an excess of pulmonary toxic deaths. In the context of a phase II trial, 38 patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer were randomised to receive once-daily (66 Gy in 33 fractions) or twice-daily (45 Gy in 30 fractions) radiotherapy. Radiotherapy (RT) was given concurrently with cisplatin and etoposide. G-CSF was given as primary or secondary prophylaxis or as a therapeutic measure during an episode of febrile neutropenia according to local protocols. Common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) v3.0 was used to record toxicity. Thirteen (34%) of 38 patients received G-CSF concurrently with RT. With a median follow-up of 16.9 months, there were no treatment related deaths reported. Seven (54%) patients experienced grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia and 5 (38%) experienced grade 3/4 anaemia. Thirty-one percent required platelet transfusions. No episodes of bleeding were observed. There were no cases of grade 3/4 acute pneumonitis. These data suggests that with modern three-dimensional (3D) conformal RT, G-CSF administration concurrently with CTRT does not result in the increase risk of pulmonary toxicity, but does increase the risk of thrombocytopenia. Whether the risks of thrombocytopenia are outweighed by the outcome of timely early concurrent CTRT is being evaluated prospectively in the ongoing phase III CONVERT trial (NCT00433563) in which G-CSF is permitted during thoracic irradiation.