• A retrospective analysis of selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 microspheres in patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies.

      Omed, A; Lawrance, Jeremy A L; Murphy, G; Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Wilson, G; Illidge, Timothy M; Tipping, Jill; Zivanovic, M; Jeans, S; Manchester Medical School, University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Manchester, UK. aliomed0101@doctors.org.uk (2010-09)
      AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was undertaken of all patients who underwent SIRT at a single institution. Diagnostic and therapeutic angiograms, computed tomography (CT) images, positron-emission tomography (PET) images, and planar isotope images were analysed. The response to SIRT was analysed using radiological data and tumour markers. Overall survival, complications, and side effects of SIRT were also analysed. RESULTS: The initial 12 patients were included on an intention-to-treat basis, between 21/09/2005 and 07/05/2008. All patients had advanced disease and multiple prior courses of chemotherapy. One patient did not receive yttrium-90 due to complex vascular anatomy; the remaining 11 patients underwent 13 SIRT treatment episodes following work-up angiography. A response was seen using PET in 80% of patients. Using CT, the response of the tumour to therapy in the treated hepatic segments demonstrated a 20% partial response, stable disease in 50%, and progressive disease in 30%. Estimated median survival was 229 days, with 64% of patients still alive at the time of writing. No major complications were observed, although 82% of patients experienced side-effects following SIRT, mainly nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. CONCLUSIONS: There have been no complications in the 12 SIRT patients. Tumour response was seen in four out of five patients who underwent PET. Objective CT response rates were mixed and are perhaps partially explained by advanced disease and limitations of using measurements to assess response. This complex and potentially hazardous service has been successfully and safely established.