• Alternating irinotecan with oxaliplatin combined with UFT plus leucovorin (SCOUT) in metastatic colorectal cancer.

      Sheikh, Hamid Y; Valle, Juan W; Waddell, Thomas K; Palmer, Karen; Wilson, Gregory; Sjursen, Ann-Marie; Craven, Olive; Swindell, Ric; Saunders, Mark P; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. (2008-08-19)
      Tegafur-uracil (UFT) plus leucovorin (LV, folinic acid) with alternating irinotecan and oxaliplatin were effective and well tolerated in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in a phase I study. This study expanded the maximum tolerated dose group. Patients aged >or=18 years had histologically confirmed, inoperable, previously untreated, measurable mCRC. Patients received irinotecan 180 mg m(-2) on day 1, oxaliplatin 100 mg m(-2) on day 15 and UFT 250 mg m(-2) plus LV 90 mg on days 1-21 every 28 days. The phase I/II study comprised 45 patients, 29 at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The response rate in 38 evaluable patients was 63% (95% confidence interval (CI): 49-80). Median time to progression and overall survival were 8.7 months (95% CI: 7.9-10.4) and 16.8 months (95% CI: 9.6-25.3), respectively. In the MTD group, one patient had grade 3 leucopenia; one had grade 3 neutropaenia; three had grade 3 diarrhoea; and one had grade 3 neurotoxicity. No hand-foot syndrome grade >1 was seen. In total, 67% of eligible patients received second-line therapy. UFT plus LV with alternating irinotecan and oxaliplatin is an efficacious first-line treatment for mCRC, with minimal neurotoxicity and hand-foot syndrome.
    • Bladder preservation multimodality therapy as an alternative to radical cystectomy for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer.

      Choudhury, Ananya; Cowan, Richard A; The Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (2011-11)
    • Capecitabine, bevacizumab, and mitomycin in first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: results of the Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group Randomized Phase III MAX Study.

      Tebbutt, Niall C; Wilson, Kate; Gebski, Val; Cummins, Michelle M; Zannino, Diana; Van Hazel, Guy A; Robinson, Bridget; Broad, Adam; Ganju, Vinod; Ackland, Stephen P; et al. (2010-07-01)
      PURPOSE: To determine whether adding bevacizumab, with or without mitomycin, to capecitabine monotherapy improves progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in an open-label, three-arm randomized trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Overall, 471 patients in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom with previously untreated, unresectable mCRC were randomly assigned to the following: capecitabine; capecitabine plus bevacizumab (CB); or capecitabine, bevacizumab, and mitomycin (CBM). We compared CB with capecitabine and CBM with capecitabine for progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS), toxicity, response rate (RR), and quality of life (QOL). RESULTS: Median PFS was 5.7 months for capecitabine, 8.5 months for CB, and 8.4 months for CBM (capecitabine v CB: hazard ratio [HR], 0.63; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.79; P < .001; C v CBM: HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.75; P < .001). After a median follow-up of 31 months, median OS was 18.9 months for capecitabine and was 16.4 months for CBM; these data were not significantly different. Toxicity rates were acceptable, and all treatment regimens well tolerated. Bevacizumab toxicities were similar to those in previous studies. Measures of overall QOL were similar in all groups. CONCLUSION: Adding bevacizumab to capecitabine, with or without mitomycin, significantly improves PFS without major additional toxicity or impairment of QOL.
    • Current treatment approaches for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

      Illidge, Timothy M; Tolan, Shaun; School of Cancer Imaging Sciences, CR UK Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. tmi@manchester.ac.uk (2008-04)
      There have been two major developments over the last decade that has led to improvements in outcome and longer survival for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). These developments have been firstly to increase the dose of active cytotoxic drugs and shorten the time between cycles, resulting in dose-dense and/or dose-intense regimens and secondly the addition of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab to chemotherapy. Both strategies have been associated with higher response rates, lower relapse rates, longer event-free survival (EFS) and improved overall survival (OS), particularly in better prognostic groups. A combination of dose-dense and dose-intense chemotherapy regimens plus rituximab is currently being tested to confirm that the use of both approaches confers survival advantage. High-risk, poorer-prognosis DLBCL remains a challenge, and new treatment strategies are required for these patients. Improvements in outcome may potentially be achieved through a greater understanding of the genetic abnormalities specifically associated with poorer-prognosis disease, and factors that lead to unresponsiveness to chemotherapy. The role of radiotherapy is currently less clearly defined than at anytime in the management of DLBCL and the current evidence for using radiotherapy in this disease is therefore rigorously reviewed.
    • EXTRA--a multicenter phase II study of chemoradiation using a 5 day per week oral regimen of capecitabine and intravenous mitomycin C in anal cancer.

      Glynne-Jones, Rob; Meadows, Helen; Wan, Susan; Gollins, Simon W; Leslie, Martin; Levine, Edward; McDonald, Alec C; Myint, A Sun; Samuel, Les; Sebag-Montefiore, David; et al. (2008-09-01)
      PURPOSE: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with epidermoid anal carcinoma. Clinical trials in other cancers have confirmed 5-FU can successfully be replaced by the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine. This phase II trial aimed to determine the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of capecitabine, MMC and radiotherapy (RT) in anal cancer patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT) II trial (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy). With MMC (12 mg/m2) on Day 1 and capecitabine on each RT treatment day in two divided doses (825 mg/m2 b.i.d). The endpoints were complete response at 4 weeks, local control at 6 months and toxicity. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients entered the trial. The median age was 61 years (range 45-86) with 14 males and 17 females. Compliance with chemotherapy with no dose interruptions or delays was 68%, and with RT was 81%. Eighteen (58%) patients completed both modalities of treatment as planned. Dose-limiting Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea was seen in 1 of 31 patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3 neutropenia. There were no treatment-related deaths. Four weeks following completion of chemoradiation, 24 patients (77%) had a complete clinical response, and 4 (16%) a partial response. With a median follow-up of 14 months, three locoregional relapses occurred. CONCLUSIONS: Capecitabine with MMC and RT in with patients anal carcinoma is well tolerated, with minimal toxicity and acceptable compliance. We recommend testing this schedule in future national Phase III studies in anal cancer.
    • How have outcomes for patients with follicular lymphoma changed with the addition of monoclonal antibodies?

      Illidge, Timothy M; Chan, Clara; School of Cancer and Imaging Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. tmi@manchester.ac.uk (2008-07)
      The outcome for patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) has substantially improved over the last few years. This improved survival appears to be largely related to the increasingly widespread use of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab in the therapy of FL today, either in combination with chemotherapy, for remission 'induction' and more recently as 'maintenance' therapy. Encouraging results have also been reported from radiolabelled anti-CD20 mAb or radioimmunotherapy (RIT), which exploits the unique method of action of this approach and high radiosensitivity of FL. High response rates and durable remissions have been seen with both (90)Y Ibritumomab tiuxetan and (131)I Tositumomab, and more recently compelling data are emerging demonstrating the efficacy of using these drugs as consolidation after initial treatment with chemotherapy or rituximab plus chemotherapy combinations. This review will focus on the current approaches and explore the data that has led to the emergence of a new nomenclature appearing in the language of clinicians involved in the treatment of FL, namely 'induction' therapy, 'consolidation' of initial response and 'maintenance' therapy. The current treatment approaches that have led to such increased optimism regarding the therapeutic outcome in FL are evaluated and discussed.
    • Irinotecan+5-fluorouracil with concomitant pre-operative radiotherapy in locally advanced non-resectable rectal cancer: a phase I/II study.

      Iles, S M; Gollins, Simon W; Susnerwala, Shabbir; Haylock, B; Myint, A Sun; Biswas, A; Swindell, Ric; Levine, Edward; Department of Clinical Oncology, The Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2008-04-08)
      In the UK, 10% of patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have inoperable disease at presentation. This study ascertained whether the resectability rate of inoperable locally advanced rectal cancer was improved by administration of intravenous irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and pelvic radiotherapy. During phase I of the trial (n=12), the dose of irinotecan was escalated in three-patient cohorts from 50 mg m(-2) to 60 mg m(-2) to 70 mg m(-2) to identify the maximum tolerated dose (60 mg m(-2)). In phase II, 31 patients with non-resectable disease received 45 Gy radiotherapy and 5-FU infusions (200 mg m(-2) per day) for 5 weeks. Irinotecan (60 mg m(-2)) was given on days 1, 8, 15 and 22. After treatment, patients were operated on if possible. Thirty patients completed the protocol, 28 underwent surgery. Before surgery, MRI restaging of 24 patients showed that 19 (79%) had a reduction in tumour stage after treatment (seven complete clinical response and 12 partial). Of 27 patients followed up after surgery, 22 (81%) had clear circumferential resection margins. Disease-free and overall survival estimates at 3 years were 65 and 90%, respectively. The regimen was well tolerated. Irinotecan, 5-FU and radiotherapy results in tumour downgrading, allowing resection of previously inoperable tumour with acceptable toxicity.
    • Management of unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer with combined-modality therapy: a review of the current literature and recommendations for treatment.

      Bayman, Neil A; Blackhall, Fiona H; Jain, Pooja; Lee, Lip W; Thatcher, Nick; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. neil.bayman@christie.nhs.uk (2008-03)
      Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer deaths in the United Kingdom, and long-term survival from lung cancer has hardly improved over the past 30 years. The benefit of combined-modality therapy with chemotherapy and radiation therapy in improving survival for patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was discovered over 10 years ago. In this comprehensive literature review, we discuss the current status of combined-modality therapy for unresectable stage III NSCLC. The efficacy and toxicity of different chemoradiation therapy regimens are presented. The potential role of novel and targeted therapies and radiation dose escalation is also considered. Finally, recommendations are made for the treatment of unresectable stage III NSCLC.
    • A phase I study of the safety and pharmacokinetics of the combination of pertuzumab (rhuMab 2C4) and capecitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors.

      Albanell, Joan; Montagut, Clara; Jones, Eileen T; Pronk, Linda; Mellado, Begoña; Beech, Janette; Gascon, Pere; Zugmaier, Gerhard; Brewster, Michael; Saunders, Mark P; et al. (2008-05-01)
      PURPOSE: To study the safety, pharmacokinetics, and recommended dose of the combination of pertuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody HER2-dimerization inhibitor, and capecitabine in patients with advanced malignancies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Patients that had progressed to standard treatment were treated with pertuzumab at a fixed dose of 1,050 mg given i.v. on day 1 plus capecitabine at doses of 825-1,000-1,250 mg/m(2), twice daily orally on days 1 to 14 of each 21-day treatment cycle, in three sequential cohorts. The pharmacokinetics of capecitabine and pertuzumab were studied. Patients received a single dose of capecitabine in a pretreatment phase (day -7) followed by serum sampling for capecitabine and its metabolites. RESULTS: Nineteen patients were accrued and 18 were assessable. The combination of capecitabine and pertuzumab was well tolerated at all dose levels and no dose-limiting toxicities were observed. The most frequent adverse event was asthenia, which was grade 3 in two patients. One asymptomatic pulmonary embolism occurred. No other grade 3 or 4 adverse events or cardiac or left ventricular ejection fraction events were reported. There was no apparent change in the pharmacokinetics of capecitabine and its metabolites when combined with pertuzumab. The pharmacokinetics of pertuzumab was apparently not modified when administered with capecitabine. Disease stabilization was observed in 11 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Pertuzumab and capecitabine were well tolerated at all dose levels. Escalation beyond the highest dose level tested was not planned, as this included the recommended doses of monotherapy for both drugs. In conclusion, this combination is ready for phase II testing.
    • A phase II study evaluating the use of concurrent mitomycin C and capecitabine in patients with advanced unresectable pseudomyxoma peritonei.

      Farquharson, Adam L; Pranesh, Nagarajan; Witham, Gary; Swindell, Ric; Taylor, Malcolm B; Renehan, Andrew G; Rout, Shantanu; Wilson, Malcolm S; O'Dwyer, Sarah T; Saunders, Mark P; et al. (2008-08-19)
      Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare neoplastic process characterised by progressive intra-abdominal dissemination of mucinous tumour, and generally considered resistant to systemic chemotherapy. A phase II study in patients with advanced unresectable PMP was undertaken to evaluate the combination of systemic concurrent mitomycin C (7 mg m(-2) i.v. on day 1) and capecitabine (1250 mg m(-2) b.d. on days 1-14) in a 3-weekly cycle (MCap). Response was determined by semiquantitative assessment of disease volume on serial computed tomographic (CT) scans and serum tumour marker (CEA, CA125, CA19-9) changes at 12 weeks. Between 2003 and 2006, 40 patients were recruited through a national centre for the treatment of peritoneal surface tumours. At baseline, 23 patients had progressive disease and 17 had stable disease. Of 39 assessable patients, 15 (38%, 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 25, 54%) benefited from chemotherapy in the form of either reductions in mucinous deposition or stabilisation of progressive pretreatment disease determined on CT scan. Notably, two patients, originally considered unresectable, following MCap and re-staging underwent potentially curative cytoreductive surgery. Grade 3/4 toxicity rates were low (6%, 95% CIs: 4, 9%). Twenty out of 29 assessed patients (69%, 95% CIs: 51, 83%) felt that their Global Health Status improved during chemotherapy. This is the first trial to demonstrate an apparent benefit of systemic chemotherapy in patients with advanced unresectable PMP.
    • Phase II study of cisplatin and imatinib in advanced salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

      Ghosal, N; Mais, Kathleen L; Shenjere, Patrick; Julyan, Peter J; Hastings, David L; Ward, Timothy H; Ryder, W David J; Bruce, I; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; et al. (2011-10)
      Patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands show over-expression of KIT in a high proportion of cases. Options for systemic treatment are limited in locally advanced and metastatic disease. We explored the efficacy of imatinib and cisplatin combined in this group of patients. A Gehan's two-stage, phase II trial was conducted on 28 patients. Those with progressive, locally advanced, and metastatic disease with an over-expression of KIT were treated with single agent imatinib 800 mg daily for two months, followed by a combination of imatinib 400mg daily and cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) at four-weekly intervals for six cycles. This was followed by maintenance single agent imatinib 400mg daily until the disease progressed. Response was monitored using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and morphological imaging using computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and chest radiographs (CT/MRI/CXR). Morphological imaging showed partial response in three of 28 patients, and five patients showed a response on FDG-PET. In addition, 19 patients had useful stabilisation of disease. The median time to progression and overall survival was 15 months (range 1-43) and 35 months (range 1-75), respectively. The combination of imatinib and cisplatin was reasonably well tolerated. This combination may provide stabilisation in locally advanced and metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.
    • Phase III randomised trial of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy compared with platinum-based chemotherapy in small-cell lung cancer.

      Baka, Sofia; Califano, Raffaele; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Ashcroft, Linda; Thatcher, Nick; Taylor, Pat; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Blackhall, Fiona H; Lorigan, Paul C; Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2008-08-05)
      This randomised trial compared platinum-based to anthracycline-based chemotherapy in patients with small-cell lung cancer (limited or extensive stage) and
    • Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan in magnetic resonance imaging-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: impact on long-term clinical outcomes.

      Gollins, S; Sun Myint, A; Haylock, Brian; Wise, M; Saunders, Mark P; Neupane, R; Essapen, S; Samuel, L; Dougal, Mark; Lloyd, A; et al. (2011-03-10)
      To assess long-term clinical outcomes of preoperative chemoradiotherapy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma using concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine.
    • Preoperative downstaging chemoradiation with concurrent irinotecan and capecitabine in MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer: a phase I trial (NWCOG-2).

      Gollins, Simon W; Myint, S; Susnerwala, S; Haylock, B; Wise, M; Topham, C; Samuel, L; Swindell, Ric; Morris, J; Mason, L; et al. (2009-09-15)
      BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of neoadjuvant chemoradiation using radiotherapy (RT) combined with concurrent capecitabine and irinotecan for locally advanced rectal cancer before surgery. METHODS: Forty-six patients were recruited and treated on the basis that MRI scanning had shown poor-risk tumours with threatening (< or =1 mm) or involvement of the mesorectal fascia. Conformal RT was given using 3 or 4 fields at daily fractions of 1.8 Gy on 5 days per week to a total dose of 45 Gy. Concurrently oral capecitabine was given twice daily throughout radiotherapy continuously from days 1 to 35 and intravenous irinotecan was given once per week during weeks 1 to 4 of RT. Dose levels were gradually escalated as follows. Dose level 1: capecitabine 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 50 mg m(-2); Dose level 2: capecitabine 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 60 mg m(-2); Dose level 3: capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 60 mg m(2); Dose level 4: capecitabine 825 mg m(-2) b.i.d. and irinotecan 70 mg m(-2). RESULTS: Diarrhoea (grade 3, no grade 4) was the main serious acute toxicity with lesser degrees of fatigue, neutropenia, anorexia and palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia. The recommended dose for future study was dose level 2 at which 3 of 14 patients (21%) developed grade 3 diarrhoea. Postoperative complications included seven pelvic or wound infections and two anastomotic and two perineal wound dehiscences. There were no deaths in the first 30 days postoperatively. Of 41 resected specimens, 11 (27%) showed a pathological complete response (pCR) and five (12%) showed an involved circumferential resection margin (defined as < or =1 mm). The 3-year disease-free survival (intent-to-treat) was 53.2%. CONCLUSION: In patients with poor-risk MRI-defined locally advanced rectal cancer threatening or involving the mesorectal fascia, preoperative chemoradiation based on RT at 45 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks with continuous daily oral capecitabine at 650 mg m(-2) b.i.d. days 1-35 and weekly IV irinotecan at 60 mg m(-2) weeks 1-4, provides acceptable acute toxicity and postoperative morbidity with encouraging response and curative resection rates.
    • The role of UFT in metastatic colorectal cancer.

      Bennouna, Jaafar; Saunders, Mark P; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Centre R Gauducheau, St Herblain, France. j-bennouna@nantes.fnclcc.fr (2009)
      5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and 5-FU combination therapy improves efficacy compared with monotherapy. The oral fluoropyrimidine UFT (tegafur-uracil) with leucovorin (LV) improves tolerability and has replaced 5-FU in many regimens. The efficacy and tolerability of UFT with LV in the first-line treatment of mCRC has been demonstrated in a number of phase II studies. In two phase III studies, UFT with LV has been shown to have comparable efficacy and improved tolerability versus intravenous bolus 5-FU, with very few cases of hand-foot syndrome (HFS). Indirect comparisons of UFT and capecitabine suggest that they are comparable in terms of survival. In first-line treatment, UFT in combination with oxaliplatin (TEGAFOX) or irinotecan (TEGAFIRI) is effective and well tolerated, with similar efficacy and tolerability to the corresponding 5-FU- and capecitabine-based combinations, but with a lower incidence of HFS. Alternating cycles of TEGAFOX and TEGAFIRI are effective and well tolerated, and the combination of TEGAFIRI and the targeted monoclonal antibody cetuximab has shown promising activity, similar to that of FOLFIRI plus cetuximab. UFT can be considered a rational replacement for intravenous 5-FU in the first- and second-line treatment of patients with mCRC.
    • SCOTCERV: a phase II trial of docetaxel and gemcitabine as second line chemotherapy in cervical cancer.

      Symonds, R P; Davidson, Susan E; Chan, S; Reed, N S; McMahon, T; Rai, D; Harden, S; Paul, J; University of Leicester, Department of Cancer Studies & Molecular Medicine, Leicester, UK. (2011-10)
      The aim of the study was to determine the response rate and response duration of cervical cancer previously treated by cisplatin (with or without radiation) to a combination of docetaxel and gemcitabine. Secondary endpoints were assessment of toxicity and quality of life (QoL) of patients receiving the treatment.
    • Use of G-CSF during concurrent chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy in patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer safety data from a phase II trial.

      Sheikh, Hamid Y; Colaco, Rovel J; Lorigan, Paul C; Blackhall, Fiona H; Califano, Raffaele; Ashcroft, Linda; Taylor, Paul; Thatcher, Nick; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Dept of Clinical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. (2011-10)
      There is paucity of data in the literature regarding the safety of combining granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) during chemo-radiotherapy (CTRT) in lung cancer patients. The ASCO 2006 recommendations advise against use of CSFs during concomitant mediastinal CTRT. The only randomised study evaluating CSFs in this context showed significant increase in grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia and an excess of pulmonary toxic deaths. In the context of a phase II trial, 38 patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer were randomised to receive once-daily (66 Gy in 33 fractions) or twice-daily (45 Gy in 30 fractions) radiotherapy. Radiotherapy (RT) was given concurrently with cisplatin and etoposide. G-CSF was given as primary or secondary prophylaxis or as a therapeutic measure during an episode of febrile neutropenia according to local protocols. Common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) v3.0 was used to record toxicity. Thirteen (34%) of 38 patients received G-CSF concurrently with RT. With a median follow-up of 16.9 months, there were no treatment related deaths reported. Seven (54%) patients experienced grade 3/4 thrombocytopenia and 5 (38%) experienced grade 3/4 anaemia. Thirty-one percent required platelet transfusions. No episodes of bleeding were observed. There were no cases of grade 3/4 acute pneumonitis. These data suggests that with modern three-dimensional (3D) conformal RT, G-CSF administration concurrently with CTRT does not result in the increase risk of pulmonary toxicity, but does increase the risk of thrombocytopenia. Whether the risks of thrombocytopenia are outweighed by the outcome of timely early concurrent CTRT is being evaluated prospectively in the ongoing phase III CONVERT trial (NCT00433563) in which G-CSF is permitted during thoracic irradiation.