• Phase II study of cisplatin and imatinib in advanced salivary adenoid cystic carcinoma.

      Ghosal, N; Mais, Kathleen L; Shenjere, Patrick; Julyan, Peter J; Hastings, David L; Ward, Timothy H; Ryder, W David J; Bruce, I; Homer, Jarrod J; Slevin, Nicholas J; et al. (2011-10)
      Patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands show over-expression of KIT in a high proportion of cases. Options for systemic treatment are limited in locally advanced and metastatic disease. We explored the efficacy of imatinib and cisplatin combined in this group of patients. A Gehan's two-stage, phase II trial was conducted on 28 patients. Those with progressive, locally advanced, and metastatic disease with an over-expression of KIT were treated with single agent imatinib 800 mg daily for two months, followed by a combination of imatinib 400mg daily and cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) at four-weekly intervals for six cycles. This was followed by maintenance single agent imatinib 400mg daily until the disease progressed. Response was monitored using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and morphological imaging using computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and chest radiographs (CT/MRI/CXR). Morphological imaging showed partial response in three of 28 patients, and five patients showed a response on FDG-PET. In addition, 19 patients had useful stabilisation of disease. The median time to progression and overall survival was 15 months (range 1-43) and 35 months (range 1-75), respectively. The combination of imatinib and cisplatin was reasonably well tolerated. This combination may provide stabilisation in locally advanced and metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.
    • A prospective observational study of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting in routine practice in a UK cancer centre.

      Molassiotis, Alexander; Saunders, Mark P; Valle, Juan W; Wilson, Gregory; Lorigan, Paul C; Wardley, Andrew M; Levine, Edward; Cowan, Richard A; Loncaster, Juliette A; Rittenberg, C; et al. (2008-02)
      OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess levels of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in routine practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was an observational prospective evaluation using patient self-reports. One hundred and two patients with cancer in a single cancer centre in UK receiving their first chemotherapy treatment participated in the study and were followed up over four cycles, providing a total of 272 assessments of nausea and vomiting. Data was collected with the use of the MASCC Antiemesis Tool (MAT), which is an eight-item short clinical scale assessing acute and delayed nausea and vomiting after chemotherapy. RESULTS: Results indicated that acute vomiting was experienced by 15.7% of the patients in cycle 1 and delayed vomiting by 14.7%, while acute nausea was present in 37.3% of the patients and delayed nausea in 47.1%, increasing over the subsequent cycles. Moderately emetogenic and highly emetogenic chemotherapy had the highest incidence of CINV, whereas patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy showed significant levels of delayed nausea. Acute symptoms were more easily controlled than delayed symptoms. DISCUSSION: The data suggest that, while vomiting is well controlled, nausea remains a significant problem in practice, and optimal management of CINV is yet to be achieved. Understanding more clearly the biological basis of nausea will assist in managing this complex symptom more effectively in practice.
    • Randomised phase II trial of 4 dose levels of single agent docetaxel in performance status (PS) 2 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): DOC PS2 trial. Manchester lung cancer group.

      Califano, Raffaele; Griffiths, Richard W; Lorigan, Paul C; Ashcroft, Linda; Taylor, Paul; Burt, Paul A; Lee, Lip W; Chittalia, Abbas; Harris, Maggie A; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; et al. (2011-09)
      The role of chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC patients and ECOG PS2 remains controversial. We evaluated 4 doses of 3-weekly docetaxel to identify a less toxic, clinically effective dose.
    • A systematic review of honey uses and its potential value within oncology care.

      Bardy, Joy; Slevin, Nicholas J; Mais, Kathleen L; Molassiotis, Alexander; School of Nursing, Social Work and Midwifery, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. (2008-10)
      AIM: To synthesise the evidence regarding honey's role in health care and to identify whether this evidence applies more specifically to cancer care. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHODS: The inclusion and exclusion criteria were agreed by two reviewers and a keyword strategy was developed. EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE and PUBMED databases were screened to identify suitable articles. The citation list from each included study was also screened for potentially suitable papers. The key findings from each study were entered onto a data extraction sheet. RESULTS: In total, 43 studies were included in the systematic review, which included studies in relation to wounds (n = 19), burns (n = 11), skin (n = 3), cancer (n = 5) and others (n = 5). In addition, a systematic review regarding honey use in wound care was also included. While the majority of studies noted the efficacy of honey in clinical use, five studies found honey to be equally as effective as the comparator and three found honey to be less effective than the comparator treatment. Other research did not illustrate any significant difference between standard treatment regimes vs. honey treatment. Studies were generally poor in quality because of small sample sizes, lack of randomisation and absence of blinding. CONCLUSIONS: Honey was found to be a suitable alternative for wound healing, burns and various skin conditions and to potentially have a role within cancer care. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In the cancer setting, honey may be used for radiation-induced mucositis, radiotherapy-induced skin reactions, hand and foot skin reactions in chemotherapy patients and for oral cavity and external surgical wounds.