• A consensus on criteria for cure of acromegaly.

      Giustina, A; Chanson, P; Bronstein, M D; Klibanski, A; Lamberts, S; Casanueva, F F; Trainer, Peter J; Ghigo, E; Ho, K; Melmed, S; et al. (2010-07)
      OBJECTIVE: The Acromegaly Consensus Group met in April 2009 to revisit the guidelines on criteria for cure as defined in 2000. PARTICIPANTS: Participants included 74 neurosurgeons and endocrinologists with extensive experience of treating acromegaly. EVIDENCE/CONSENSUS PROCESS: Relevant assays, biochemical measures, clinical outcomes, and definition of disease control were discussed, based on the available published evidence, and the strength of consensus statements was rated. CONCLUSIONS: Criteria to define active acromegaly and disease control were agreed, and several significant changes were made to the 2000 guidelines. Appropriate methods of measuring and achieving disease control were summarized.
    • Current management practices for acromegaly: an international survey.

      Giustina, A; Bronstein, M D; Casanueva, F F; Chanson, P; Ghigo, E; Ho, K K Y; Klibanski, A; Lamberts, S; Trainer, Peter J; Melmed, S; et al. (2011-06)
      To determine whether peer-reviewed consensus statements have changed clinical practice, we surveyed acromegaly care in specialist centers across the globe, and determined the degree of adherence to published consensus guidelines on acromegaly management. Sixty-five acromegaly experts who participated in the 7th Acromegaly Consensus Workshop in March 2009 responded. Results indicated that the most common referring sources for acromegaly patients were other endocrinologists (in 26% of centers), neurosurgeons (25%) and primary care physicians (21%). In sixty-nine percent of patients, biochemical diagnoses were made by evaluating results of a combination of growth hormone (GH) nadir/basal GH and elevated insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels. In both Europe and the USA, neurosurgery was the treatment of choice for GH-secreting microadenomas and for macroadenomas with compromised visual function. The most widely used criteria for neurosurgical outcome assessment were combined measurements of IGF-I and GH levels after oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 3 months after surgery. Ninety-eight percent of respondents stated that primary treatment with somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) was indicated at least sometime during the management of acromegaly patients. In nearly all centers (96%), the use of pegvisomant monotherapy was restricted to patients who had failed to achieve biochemical control with SRL therapy. The observation that most centers followed consensus statement recommendations encourages the future utility of these workshops aimed to create uniform management standards for acromegaly.