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dc.contributor.authorPinkham, Mark B
dc.contributor.authorSanghera, P
dc.contributor.authorWall, G
dc.contributor.authorDawson, B
dc.contributor.authorWhitfield, Gillian A
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T10:31:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-21T10:31:15Zen
dc.date.issued2015-06-25en
dc.identifier.citationNeurocognitive Effects Following Cranial Irradiation for Brain Metastases. 2015: Clin Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn1433-2981en
dc.identifier.pmid26119727en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clon.2015.06.005en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/560768en
dc.description.abstractAbout 90% of patients with brain metastases have impaired neurocognitive function at diagnosis and up to two-thirds will show further declines within 2-6 months of whole brain radiotherapy. Distinguishing treatment effects from progressive disease can be challenging because the prognosis remains poor in many patients. Omitting whole brain radiotherapy after local therapy in good prognosis patients improves verbal memory at 4 months, but the effect of higher intracranial recurrence and salvage therapy rates on neurocognitive function beyond this time point is unknown. Hippocampal-sparing whole brain radiotherapy and postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery are investigational techniques intended to reduce toxicity. Here we describe the changes that can occur and review technological, pharmacological and practical approaches used to mitigate their effect in clinical practice.
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain))en
dc.titleNeurocognitive Effects Following Cranial Irradiation for Brain Metastases.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClinical Oncology, The University of Manchester, Manchester Cancer Research Centre, Manchester Academic Health Science Centreen
dc.identifier.journalClinical Oncologyen
html.description.abstractAbout 90% of patients with brain metastases have impaired neurocognitive function at diagnosis and up to two-thirds will show further declines within 2-6 months of whole brain radiotherapy. Distinguishing treatment effects from progressive disease can be challenging because the prognosis remains poor in many patients. Omitting whole brain radiotherapy after local therapy in good prognosis patients improves verbal memory at 4 months, but the effect of higher intracranial recurrence and salvage therapy rates on neurocognitive function beyond this time point is unknown. Hippocampal-sparing whole brain radiotherapy and postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery are investigational techniques intended to reduce toxicity. Here we describe the changes that can occur and review technological, pharmacological and practical approaches used to mitigate their effect in clinical practice.


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