Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPinkham, Mark Ben
dc.contributor.authorTelford, Nicholasen
dc.contributor.authorWhitfield, Gillian Aen
dc.contributor.authorColaco, Rovel Jen
dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Franen
dc.contributor.authorMcBain, Catherine Aen
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-01T07:51:30Zen
dc.date.available2015-07-01T07:51:30Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-10en
dc.identifier.citationFISHing Tips: What Every Clinician Should Know About 1p19q Analysis in Gliomas Using Fluorescence in situ Hybridisation. 2015: Clin Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn1433-2981en
dc.identifier.pmid25971646en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clon.2015.04.008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/558727en
dc.description.abstract1p19q co-deletion is a chromosomal alteration associated with primary brain tumours of oligodendroglial histology. It is an established predictive and prognostic biomarker that informs whether patients are offered radiotherapy, chemotherapy or both. In the near future, 1p19q co-deletion status may also be incorporated into the reclassification of gliomas. Analysis is commonly carried out using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) because it is a reliable and validated laboratory technique. The result is generally considered to be dichotomous (1p19q co-deletion present or absent), but there are subtleties in interpretation that are of clinical relevance. Separate centres may interpret certain chromosome deletion patterns differently. Pivotal trials in mixed and pure anaplastic oligodendrogliomas have used slightly different FISH probe ratios as the cut-off for chromosome deletion. Here we review the clinical implications of this variability and review the process of 1p19q co-deletion assessment using FISH in gliomas from a clinician's perspective. We also consider common alternative methods of analysis.
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain))en
dc.titleFISHing Tips: What Every Clinician Should Know About 1p19q Analysis in Gliomas Using Fluorescence in situ Hybridisation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClinical Oncology, Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UKen
dc.identifier.journalClinical Oncologyen
html.description.abstract1p19q co-deletion is a chromosomal alteration associated with primary brain tumours of oligodendroglial histology. It is an established predictive and prognostic biomarker that informs whether patients are offered radiotherapy, chemotherapy or both. In the near future, 1p19q co-deletion status may also be incorporated into the reclassification of gliomas. Analysis is commonly carried out using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) because it is a reliable and validated laboratory technique. The result is generally considered to be dichotomous (1p19q co-deletion present or absent), but there are subtleties in interpretation that are of clinical relevance. Separate centres may interpret certain chromosome deletion patterns differently. Pivotal trials in mixed and pure anaplastic oligodendrogliomas have used slightly different FISH probe ratios as the cut-off for chromosome deletion. Here we review the clinical implications of this variability and review the process of 1p19q co-deletion assessment using FISH in gliomas from a clinician's perspective. We also consider common alternative methods of analysis.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record