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dc.contributor.authorMcPartlin, Andrew J
dc.contributor.authorGrimaldo, Claudia
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Jeanette
dc.contributor.authorBurke, D
dc.contributor.authorMitra, S
dc.contributor.authorChoudhury, Ananya
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-19T13:53:27Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-19T13:53:27Zen
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.identifier.citationSuccessful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. 2014, 7 (6):593-4 Clin Kidney Jen
dc.identifier.issn2048-8505en
dc.identifier.pmid25859378en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ckj/sfu097en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/554157en
dc.description.abstractWe report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m(2) of carboplatin and 50 mg/m(2) of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of over 12 months post-treatment the patient shows no clinical evidence of recurrent disease. This case provides evidence to encourage the use of chemotherapy in otherwise potentially undertreated haemodialysed patients.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical kidney journalen
dc.titleSuccessful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Christie NHS Foundation Trust , Manchester , UKThe Christie NHS Foundation Trust , Manchester , UKen
dc.identifier.journalClinical Kidney Journalen
html.description.abstractWe report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m(2) of carboplatin and 50 mg/m(2) of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of over 12 months post-treatment the patient shows no clinical evidence of recurrent disease. This case provides evidence to encourage the use of chemotherapy in otherwise potentially undertreated haemodialysed patients.


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