• Can communication skills be taught?

      Maguire, Peter; Christie Hospital, Manchester. (1990-03)
      Basic interviewing skills can be learned at undergraduate and postgraduate level, providing effective methods are used. These include demonstration of key skills, practice under controlled conditions, and audiotape or videotape feedback of performance by a tutor within small groups. More complex skills can also be learned but may not be used or maintained without ongoing training and supervision.
    • Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations: impact on clinical radiology.

      Walker, Anne; Tuck, J S; North Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2001-07)
    • Training logbook for radiotherapy.

      Hunter, Robin D; Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Leer, Jan Willem; Kinay, Munir; Heeren, Germaine; Department of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2004-02)
      AIM: To develop a structured logbook for trainees in the medical specialty of radiotherapy with Europe that records the increasing experience throughout their training period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A working party appointed by the European Board of Radiotherapy developed a draft version of a European logbook for trainees in radiotherapy. For development, the update European Core Curriculum for Radiotherapists (Radiation Oncologists) was taken into consideration. The logbook is composed of six sections: (1) biodata of the trainee, (2) scientific training documentation, (3) clinical training documentation, (4) record of formal presentations by the trainee, (5) publications, (6) training courses. Decisions were made to suggest that the clinical section of the logbook should: (a) only collect data that was essential for the purposes of appraisal, assessment and regulation, (b) be as user friendly as possible, (c) concentrate on quality of the data and not volume. The logbook was tested by trainees in several European training departments and adapted according to their suggestions. A final draft of the logbook was circulated among the national and professional societies for radiotherapy in Europe for review before a European consensus conference took place in Brussels in December 2002. RESULTS: The European training logbook for radiotherapy was endorsed by representatives of 35 European nations during the Brussels consensus conference on December 14, 2002. CONCLUSION: Keeping a training logbook is an essential feature of the record of training for all EU trainees who wish to retain an opportunity to spend part of their training time in another country of the Union, important for someone who seeks an appointment as a specialist in another country within a few years of achieving specialist accreditation, and good professional practice for all other trainees. The European training logbook for radiotherapy is a robust instrument that allows the systematic collection of the information that needs to be recorded to monitor the professional development of European trainees in Radiation Oncology.
    • Updated European core curriculum for radiotherapists (radiation oncologists). Recommended curriculum for the specialist training of medical practitioners in radiotherapy (radiation oncology) within Europe.

      Baumann, Michael; Leer, Jan Willem; Dahl, O; De Neve, W; Hunter, Robin D; Rampling, R; Verfaillie, C; Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden, Germany. (2004-02)
      AIM: To produce updated state-of-the-art recommendations for harmonised medical specialist training in radiotherapy within Europe. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The Minimum Curriculum for the Theoretical Education in Radiation Oncology in Europe from 1991 was updated under consideration of new developments in medicine in general, and in radiotherapy and its basic sciences in particular. Recent medical developments, national guidelines and training programmes from European countries, as well as equivalent documents from the USA and Australia were reviewed by an expert panel jointly appointed by the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the European Board of Radiotherapy. A draft document prepared by this group was circulated among the national and professional societies for radiotherapy in Europe for review before a European consensus conference took place in Brussels in December 2002. RESULTS: The updated European Core Curriculum for Radiotherapists (Radiation Oncologists) was endorsed by representatives of 35 European nations during the Brussels consensus conference on December 14, 2002. Compared to the earlier version the updated document contains specific recommendations not only for the 5 year training curriculum but also for organisatoric and infrastructural aspects of teaching departments, and for supplementation of the training by formal teaching courses. CONCLUSION: The updated European core curriculum is an important step on the way to fully harmonise medical specialist training in Europe and to guarantee equal access for all European citizens to highest quality medical care. The responsibility for the implementation of the standards and guidelines set in the updated Core Curriculum for radiotherapy (radiation oncology) will lie with the local and/or national training bodies and authorities.