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dc.contributor.authorJohal, K
dc.contributor.authorHighton, L
dc.contributor.authorOudit, Deemesh
dc.contributor.authorLaitung, J
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-25T11:55:11Z
dc.date.available2015-02-25T11:55:11Z
dc.date.issued2015-02
dc.identifier.citationProphylactic venous cannulation of the pedicled TRAM flap in breast reconstruction. 2015, 49 (1):59-61 J Plast Surg Hand Surgen
dc.identifier.issn2000-6764
dc.identifier.pmid25272191
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/2000656X.2014.964722
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/345310
dc.description.abstractAbstract Since its inception nearly 30 years ago, the pedicled TRAM flap has remained a reliable technique of breast reconstruction. However, venous congestion of the flap in the early postoperative period is well recognised and may lead to partial or total flap loss. This study describes a simple technique routinely employed by the senior author over 15 years involving intraoperative cannulation of the deep inferior epigastric vein and externalisation into an ileostomy bag, in order to facilitate drainage and reduce the likelihood of venous congestion. In addition to its role in breast reconstruction, this technique may be a useful adjunct to any form of free or pedicled tissue transfer.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of plastic surgery and hand surgeryen
dc.titleProphylactic venous cannulation of the pedicled TRAM flap in breast reconstruction.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Royal Preston Hospital, Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust , Prestonen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgeryen
html.description.abstractAbstract Since its inception nearly 30 years ago, the pedicled TRAM flap has remained a reliable technique of breast reconstruction. However, venous congestion of the flap in the early postoperative period is well recognised and may lead to partial or total flap loss. This study describes a simple technique routinely employed by the senior author over 15 years involving intraoperative cannulation of the deep inferior epigastric vein and externalisation into an ileostomy bag, in order to facilitate drainage and reduce the likelihood of venous congestion. In addition to its role in breast reconstruction, this technique may be a useful adjunct to any form of free or pedicled tissue transfer.


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