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dc.contributor.authorVose, Brent M
dc.contributor.authorHarding, M
dc.contributor.authorWhite, W
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Michael
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, John T
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-08T10:40:24Z
dc.date.available2015-01-08T10:40:24Z
dc.date.issued1983-03
dc.identifier.citationEffect of simple sugars on natural killing: evidence against the involvement of a lectin like mechanism in target recognition. 1983, 51 (3):517-24 Clin Exp Immunolen
dc.identifier.issn0009-9104
dc.identifier.pmid6682730
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/337928
dc.description.abstractThe spontaneous lysis of target cells sensitive to natural killer (NK) activity is accomplished in two distinct phases: (i) binding between target and effector cells and (ii) post-binding events leading to target cell destruction. To test the hypothesis that cell surface carbohydrate(s) might be involved in recognitive and/or lytic events, the binding and cytotoxicity of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) towards NK sensitive K-562 targets was studied in the presence of simple sugars and after treatment of the targets with the antibiotic, tunicamycin. Lysis by peripheral blood lymphocytes was found to be inhibited by N-acetyl glucosamine, N-acetyl galactosamine and alpha-methyl mannoside in a dose-dependent manner under conditions where neither these sugars nor those (fucose, galactose) which had little effect on lysis inhibited the binding of effector cells to targets. Further, growth of K-562 in tunicamycin (which inhibits N-linked glycosylations occurring through the lipid intermediate pathway) with or without subsequent treatment with the enzyme neuraminidase, markedly reduced cell surface expression of sugars monitored by lectin binding. Treated cells showed no loss of NK susceptibility and were frequently more sensitive to lysis. Sugar inhibition profiles were the same as for untreated cells. These data suggest that carbohydrates are not the target sites of NK recognition but that simple sugars may have an inhibitory action at a later stage of the lytic process.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical and experimental immunologyen
dc.subject.meshAcetylgalactosamine
dc.subject.meshAcetylglucosamine
dc.subject.meshBinding Sites
dc.subject.meshCarbohydrates
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultured
dc.subject.meshCytotoxicity, Immunologic
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Drug
dc.subject.meshFucose
dc.subject.meshGalactose
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshKiller Cells, Natural
dc.subject.meshLectins
dc.subject.meshMethylmannosides
dc.subject.meshTunicamycin
dc.titleEffect of simple sugars on natural killing: evidence against the involvement of a lectin like mechanism in target recognition.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Immunology,Paterson Laboratories, Christie Hospital Manchester UKen
dc.identifier.journalClinical and Experimental Immunologyen
html.description.abstractThe spontaneous lysis of target cells sensitive to natural killer (NK) activity is accomplished in two distinct phases: (i) binding between target and effector cells and (ii) post-binding events leading to target cell destruction. To test the hypothesis that cell surface carbohydrate(s) might be involved in recognitive and/or lytic events, the binding and cytotoxicity of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) towards NK sensitive K-562 targets was studied in the presence of simple sugars and after treatment of the targets with the antibiotic, tunicamycin. Lysis by peripheral blood lymphocytes was found to be inhibited by N-acetyl glucosamine, N-acetyl galactosamine and alpha-methyl mannoside in a dose-dependent manner under conditions where neither these sugars nor those (fucose, galactose) which had little effect on lysis inhibited the binding of effector cells to targets. Further, growth of K-562 in tunicamycin (which inhibits N-linked glycosylations occurring through the lipid intermediate pathway) with or without subsequent treatment with the enzyme neuraminidase, markedly reduced cell surface expression of sugars monitored by lectin binding. Treated cells showed no loss of NK susceptibility and were frequently more sensitive to lysis. Sugar inhibition profiles were the same as for untreated cells. These data suggest that carbohydrates are not the target sites of NK recognition but that simple sugars may have an inhibitory action at a later stage of the lytic process.


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