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dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, John M
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Christopher J
dc.contributor.authorNotley, H Maeve
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Robin D
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-23T13:31:24Z
dc.date.available2014-12-23T13:31:24Z
dc.date.issued1983-06
dc.identifier.citationThe use of Selectron afterloading equipment to simulate and extend the Manchester System for intracavitary therapy of the cervix uteri. 1983, 56 (666):409-14 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285
dc.identifier.pmid6687820
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/337584
dc.description.abstractWhen Selectron afterloading machines were introduced in the Christie Hospital the first aim was to reproduce, as closely as possible, the isodose distributions achieved with the traditional Manchester Radium System. This resulted in the establishment of standard pellet loading patterns, and standard treatment times, for programming the Selectron channels. However, the availability of whole-body CT scanning facilities provides a method of accurately locating the source positions with respect to the local anatomy and hence the possibility of dosage control based on doses to specific pelvic structures. Various computer programs have been written to extract source position data from the CT images, to allow the operator to propose pellet loading patterns and treatment times, and ultimately to display the resultant isodose distribution superposed on the cross-sectional scans. The effects on the dose distribution arising from changing the number of pellets, the pellet positions within the applicators, and the treatment times, are briefly discussed.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The British journal of radiologyen
dc.subject.meshBrachytherapy
dc.subject.meshCesium Radioisotopes
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshRadiotherapy Dosage
dc.subject.meshSoftware
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms
dc.titleThe use of Selectron afterloading equipment to simulate and extend the Manchester System for intracavitary therapy of the cervix uteri.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRegional Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, The Christie Hospital, Withington, Manchesteren
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Radiologyen
html.description.abstractWhen Selectron afterloading machines were introduced in the Christie Hospital the first aim was to reproduce, as closely as possible, the isodose distributions achieved with the traditional Manchester Radium System. This resulted in the establishment of standard pellet loading patterns, and standard treatment times, for programming the Selectron channels. However, the availability of whole-body CT scanning facilities provides a method of accurately locating the source positions with respect to the local anatomy and hence the possibility of dosage control based on doses to specific pelvic structures. Various computer programs have been written to extract source position data from the CT images, to allow the operator to propose pellet loading patterns and treatment times, and ultimately to display the resultant isodose distribution superposed on the cross-sectional scans. The effects on the dose distribution arising from changing the number of pellets, the pellet positions within the applicators, and the treatment times, are briefly discussed.


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