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dc.contributor.authorBeardwell, Colin G
dc.contributor.authorHindley, A C
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Peter M
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Ian D
dc.contributor.authorRibeiro, G
dc.contributor.authorBu'Lock, D
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T12:12:27Z
dc.date.available2014-12-09T12:12:27Z
dc.date.issued1983
dc.identifier.citationTrilostane in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. 1983, 10 (3):158-60 Cancer Chemother Pharmacolen
dc.identifier.issn0344-5704
dc.identifier.pmid6861259
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/336954
dc.description.abstractThe combination of trilostane 960 mg daily and either dexamethasone 0.5 mg b.d. or hydrocortisone 10 mg b.d. has been used to treat advanced metastatic breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Twenty-three patients had assessable disease and received treatment for a minimum of 8 weeks. Six (26%) showed an objective response and three (13%), stabilisation of previously progressive disease, sustained for at least 3 months. Side-effects were mainly gastrointestinal. Biochemical studies suggest that the mechanism of action may be inhibition of conversion of androstenedione to oestrone.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacologyen
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshDexamethasone
dc.subject.meshDihydrotestosterone
dc.subject.meshDrug Therapy, Combination
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshHydrocortisone
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Metastasis
dc.titleTrilostane in the treatment of advanced breast cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, WIlmslow Rd, Manchester M20 9BXen
dc.identifier.journalCancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacologyen
html.description.abstractThe combination of trilostane 960 mg daily and either dexamethasone 0.5 mg b.d. or hydrocortisone 10 mg b.d. has been used to treat advanced metastatic breast cancer in post-menopausal women. Twenty-three patients had assessable disease and received treatment for a minimum of 8 weeks. Six (26%) showed an objective response and three (13%), stabilisation of previously progressive disease, sustained for at least 3 months. Side-effects were mainly gastrointestinal. Biochemical studies suggest that the mechanism of action may be inhibition of conversion of androstenedione to oestrone.


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