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dc.contributor.authorSwerdlow, A
dc.contributor.authorCooke, R
dc.contributor.authorBates, A
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, D
dc.contributor.authorFalk, S
dc.contributor.authorGilson, D
dc.contributor.authorHancock, B
dc.contributor.authorHarris, S
dc.contributor.authorHorwich, A
dc.contributor.authorHoskin, P
dc.contributor.authorLinch, D
dc.contributor.authorLister, A
dc.contributor.authorLucraft, H
dc.contributor.authorRadford, John A
dc.contributor.authorStevens, A
dc.contributor.authorSyndikus, I
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, M
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-22T09:04:08Z
dc.date.available2014-09-22T09:04:08Z
dc.date.issued2014-08
dc.identifier.citationRisk of premature menopause after treatment for Hodgkin's Lymphoma. 2014, 106 (9): J Natl Cancer Insten
dc.identifier.issn1460-2105
dc.identifier.pmid25139687
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/jnci/dju207
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/326332
dc.description.abstractModern treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has transformed its prognosis but causes late effects, including premature menopause. Cohort studies of premature menopause risks after treatment have been relatively small, and knowledge about these risks is limited.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of the National Cancer Instituteen
dc.titleRisk of premature menopause after treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivisions of Genetics and Epidemiology (AJS, RC), Breast Cancer Research (AJS) and Radiotherapy (AH), Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK; University of Manchester and Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK (JR); Gastrointestinal Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, UK (DC); Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral, UK (IS); Cancer Research UK Medical Oncology Unit, St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK (TAL); Cancer Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex, UK (PJH); St. James Institute of Oncology, Leeds, UK (DG); Northern Centre for Cancer Care, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle, UK (HHL); Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, Bristol, UK (SJF); Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK (MVW); Academic Unit of Clinical Oncology, Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield, UK (BWH); Guy's and St. Thomas, London, UK (SJH); Department of Haematology, University College Hospital, London, UK (DCL); Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK (AB); Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK (AMS). The England and Wales Hodgkin Lymphoma Follow-up Group includes the authors of this article plus: Gabriel Anghel, Lincoln Hospital; Brian Attock, North Devon District Hospital; Jane Barrett, Royal Berkshire Hospital; Andrew Bell, Poole Hospital; Kim Benstead, Cheltenham General Hospital; Eric M. Bessell, Nottingham University Hospital; Ashoke Biswas, Royal Preston Hospital; Norbert Blesing, Great Western Hospital, Swindon; Caroline Brammer, New Cross Hospital, Wolverhampton; Jill Brock, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology; Alison Brownell, Queens Hospital, Romford; A. Murray Brunt, University Hospital of North Staffordshire; Peter B. Coates, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, King's Lynn; Matthew P. Collinson, Royal Cornwall Hospital; Neville Davidson, Essex County Hospital; Sian Davies, North Middlesex University Hospital; Ian Fentiman, Guy's Hospital; Eve Gallop-Evans, Velindre Hospital; Angel Garcia, Glan Clwyd Hospital; Andrew Goodman, Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital; Aden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the National Cancer Instituteen
dc.description.collectionLymphoma Research Teamen
html.description.abstractModern treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has transformed its prognosis but causes late effects, including premature menopause. Cohort studies of premature menopause risks after treatment have been relatively small, and knowledge about these risks is limited.


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