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dc.contributor.authorShenjere, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorFisher, C
dc.contributor.authorRajab, R
dc.contributor.authorPatnaik, L
dc.contributor.authorHazell, S
dc.contributor.authorThway, K
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-27T15:17:37Z
dc.date.available2014-05-27T15:17:37Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-29
dc.identifier.citationMelanomas With Rhabdomyosarcomatous Differentiation: Two Further Cases of a Rare Pathologic Pitfall. 2014: Int. J. Surg. Pathol.en
dc.identifier.issn1940-2465
dc.identifier.pmid24788528
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1066896914531817
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/317481
dc.description.abstractWe describe 2 new cases of malignant melanoma with divergent rhabdomyoblastic differentiation occurring in adult patients. The patients were women aged 67 and 51 years with primary cutaneous and uterine cervical melanoma, respectively. Rhabdomyoblastic differentiation in melanoma is very rare in adult patients, and to our knowledge, only 7 such cases have been described in the world literature, of which only 4 have conclusive documentation of the presence of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. We present the fifth and sixth cases of adult melanomas with conclusive divergent rhabdomyoblastic differentiation, including the first noncutaneous (cervical) case; we also review the literature and highlight the potential for underrecognition of this phenomenon.
dc.languageENG
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of surgical pathologyen
dc.subjectMelanomaen
dc.subjectRhabdomyosarcomaen
dc.titleMelanomas With Rhabdomyosarcomatous Differentiation: Two Further Cases of a Rare Pathologic Pitfall.
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Histopathology, The Christie Hospital, Manchester, UKen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Surgical Pathologyen
html.description.abstractWe describe 2 new cases of malignant melanoma with divergent rhabdomyoblastic differentiation occurring in adult patients. The patients were women aged 67 and 51 years with primary cutaneous and uterine cervical melanoma, respectively. Rhabdomyoblastic differentiation in melanoma is very rare in adult patients, and to our knowledge, only 7 such cases have been described in the world literature, of which only 4 have conclusive documentation of the presence of rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. We present the fifth and sixth cases of adult melanomas with conclusive divergent rhabdomyoblastic differentiation, including the first noncutaneous (cervical) case; we also review the literature and highlight the potential for underrecognition of this phenomenon.


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