Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBulusu, V
dc.contributor.authorFullarton, J
dc.contributor.authorLeahy, Michael G
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, C
dc.contributor.authorRasheed, A
dc.contributor.authorTaniere, P
dc.contributor.authorToh, S
dc.contributor.authorVerrill, M
dc.contributor.authorWhite, J
dc.contributor.authorJudson, I
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-20T10:21:10Z
dc.date.available2013-12-20T10:21:10Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-17
dc.identifier.citationRationale and design of a UK database for a rare cancer type: the GEM Registry for gastrointestinal stromal tumours. 2013, 109 (6):1403-7 Br J Canceren
dc.identifier.issn1532-1827
dc.identifier.pmid23963143
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/bjc.2013.406
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/308823
dc.description.abstractDespite advances in the management of and changes in clinical practice, little is known about the epidemiology, patterns of care and outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) patients in the UK. Patient registries are receiving increasing attention as they can provide important information on clinical practice and patient outcomes. The rationale and study design of the GIST Epidemiology and Management (GEM) Registry, which forms part of the routine clinical practice for GISTs in several UK centres, are described.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British journal of canceren
dc.titleRationale and design of a UK database for a rare cancer type: the GEM Registry for gastrointestinal stromal tumours.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren
html.description.abstractDespite advances in the management of and changes in clinical practice, little is known about the epidemiology, patterns of care and outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) patients in the UK. Patient registries are receiving increasing attention as they can provide important information on clinical practice and patient outcomes. The rationale and study design of the GIST Epidemiology and Management (GEM) Registry, which forms part of the routine clinical practice for GISTs in several UK centres, are described.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record