Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHodgetts, Jackie
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-25T13:35:42Z
dc.date.available2013-09-25T13:35:42Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationCauses and treatment of malignant melanoma.109 (28):12-5 Nurs Timesen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0954-7762
dc.identifier.pmid23971315
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/302264
dc.description.abstractThe incidence of melanoma is rising faster than any other malignancy. As more cases are diagnosed, it is likely that general nurses will come into contact with melanoma patients. This article discusses the identification, treatment and prognosis for this group of patients.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nursing timesen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonal
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIndoles
dc.subject.meshMelanoma
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Radiation-Induced
dc.subject.meshNurse's Role
dc.subject.meshNursing
dc.subject.meshOncologic Nursing
dc.subject.meshPrevalence
dc.subject.meshSulfonamides
dc.titleCauses and treatment of malignant melanoma.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Christie Foundation Trust, Manchester.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalNursing Timesen_GB
html.description.abstractThe incidence of melanoma is rising faster than any other malignancy. As more cases are diagnosed, it is likely that general nurses will come into contact with melanoma patients. This article discusses the identification, treatment and prognosis for this group of patients.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record