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dc.contributor.authorShaw, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorClamp, Andrew R
dc.contributor.authorJayson, Gordon C
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-30T13:46:01Z
dc.date.available2013-08-30T13:46:01Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.citationAngiogenesis as a target for the treatment of ovarian cancer. 2013, 25 (5):558-65 Curr Opin Oncolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1531-703X
dc.identifier.pmid23942301
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/CCO.0b013e328363e0da
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/300439
dc.description.abstractAngiogenesis has been validated as a target in ovarian cancer through four randomized trials that have reported improved progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ovarian cancer whose conventional treatment was supplemented with concurrent and maintenance administration of the antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, bevacizumab. These trials [the International Collaborative Ovarian Neoplasm Group trial (ICON7), the Gynecologic Oncology Group trial (GOG218), OCEANS and AURELIA] have shown that the tumour vasculature is a valid target throughout the lifetime of patients with ovarian cancer. This review seeks to address some of the remaining questions surrounding the optimal strategy for the use of bevacizumab in ovarian cancer.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Current opinion in oncologyen_GB
dc.titleAngiogenesis as a target for the treatment of ovarian cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Cancer Studies, Christie Hospital, University of Manchester, Withington, Manchester, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Oncologyen_GB
html.description.abstractAngiogenesis has been validated as a target in ovarian cancer through four randomized trials that have reported improved progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ovarian cancer whose conventional treatment was supplemented with concurrent and maintenance administration of the antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody, bevacizumab. These trials [the International Collaborative Ovarian Neoplasm Group trial (ICON7), the Gynecologic Oncology Group trial (GOG218), OCEANS and AURELIA] have shown that the tumour vasculature is a valid target throughout the lifetime of patients with ovarian cancer. This review seeks to address some of the remaining questions surrounding the optimal strategy for the use of bevacizumab in ovarian cancer.


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