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dc.contributor.authorSenthong, P
dc.contributor.authorMillington, C
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, O
dc.contributor.authorMarriott, Andrew S
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Amanda J
dc.contributor.authorReamtong, O
dc.contributor.authorEyers, C
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, D
dc.contributor.authorMargison, Geoffrey P
dc.contributor.authorPovey, A
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-15T16:24:58Z
dc.date.available2013-03-15T16:24:58Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-17
dc.identifier.citationThe nitrosated bile acid DNA lesion O6-carboxymethylguanine is a substrate for the human DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. 2013: Nucleic Acids Resen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1362-4962
dc.identifier.pmid23335782
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/nar/gks1476
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/272998
dc.description.abstractThe consumption of red meat is a risk factor in human colorectal cancer (CRC). One hypothesis is that red meat facilitates the nitrosation of bile acid conjugates and amino acids, which rapidly convert to DNA-damaging carcinogens. Indeed, the toxic and mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-carboxymethylguanine (O(6)-CMG) is frequently present in human DNA, increases in abundance in people with high levels of dietary red meat and may therefore be a causative factor in CRC. Previous reports suggested that O(6)-CMG is not a substrate for the human version of the DNA damage reversal protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which protects against the genotoxic effects of other O(6)-alkylguanine lesions by removing alkyl groups from the O(6)-position. We now show that synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing the known MGMT substrate O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-MeG) or O(6)-CMG effectively inactivate MGMT in vitro (IC(50) 0.93 and 1.8 nM, respectively). Inactivation involves the removal of the O(6)-alkyl group and its transfer to the active-site cysteine residue of MGMT. O(6)-CMG is therefore an MGMT substrate, and hence MGMT is likely to be a protective factor in CRC under conditions where O(6)-CMG is a potential causative agent.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nucleic acids researchen_GB
dc.titleThe nitrosated bile acid DNA lesion O6-carboxymethylguanine is a substrate for the human DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Faculty of Medical & Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK, Department of Chemistry, Centre for Chemical Biology, Krebs Institute, Richard Roberts Building, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S3 7HF, UK, Cancer Research-UK Carcinogenesis Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, University of Manchester, Manchester M20 9BX, UK and School of Chemistry, Michael Barber Centre for Mass Spectrometry, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalNucleic Acids Researchen_GB
html.description.abstractThe consumption of red meat is a risk factor in human colorectal cancer (CRC). One hypothesis is that red meat facilitates the nitrosation of bile acid conjugates and amino acids, which rapidly convert to DNA-damaging carcinogens. Indeed, the toxic and mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-carboxymethylguanine (O(6)-CMG) is frequently present in human DNA, increases in abundance in people with high levels of dietary red meat and may therefore be a causative factor in CRC. Previous reports suggested that O(6)-CMG is not a substrate for the human version of the DNA damage reversal protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which protects against the genotoxic effects of other O(6)-alkylguanine lesions by removing alkyl groups from the O(6)-position. We now show that synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing the known MGMT substrate O(6)-methylguanine (O(6)-MeG) or O(6)-CMG effectively inactivate MGMT in vitro (IC(50) 0.93 and 1.8 nM, respectively). Inactivation involves the removal of the O(6)-alkyl group and its transfer to the active-site cysteine residue of MGMT. O(6)-CMG is therefore an MGMT substrate, and hence MGMT is likely to be a protective factor in CRC under conditions where O(6)-CMG is a potential causative agent.


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