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dc.contributor.authorLee, Rebecca J
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Anne C
dc.contributor.authorWardley, Andrew M
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-14T09:49:03Z
dc.date.available2013-01-14T09:49:03Z
dc.date.issued2012-11
dc.identifier.citationLetrozole: advancing hormone therapy in breast cancer. 2012, 8 (6):611-8 Womens Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1745-5065
dc.identifier.pmid23181527
dc.identifier.doi10.2217/whe.12.49
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/265198
dc.description.abstractLetrozole is a type 2 aromatase inhibitor, which reduces availability of estrogen in postmenopausal women, thereby decreasing its ability to stimulate breast cancer cells. Phase III trials in both the advanced and early breast cancer setting have shown an improvement in disease-free survival compared with other compounds, including tamoxifen. Letrozole is well-tolerated, with the main adverse effects reported as hot flushes, arthritis, arthralgia and myalgia, and a trend towards increased risk of fracture.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Women's health (London, England)en_GB
dc.titleLetrozole: advancing hormone therapy in breast cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalWomens Healthen_GB
html.description.abstractLetrozole is a type 2 aromatase inhibitor, which reduces availability of estrogen in postmenopausal women, thereby decreasing its ability to stimulate breast cancer cells. Phase III trials in both the advanced and early breast cancer setting have shown an improvement in disease-free survival compared with other compounds, including tamoxifen. Letrozole is well-tolerated, with the main adverse effects reported as hot flushes, arthritis, arthralgia and myalgia, and a trend towards increased risk of fracture.


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