Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEvans, C
dc.contributor.authorNoirel, J
dc.contributor.authorOw, S
dc.contributor.authorSalim, M
dc.contributor.authorPereira-Medrano, A
dc.contributor.authorCouto, N
dc.contributor.authorPandhal, J
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Duncan L
dc.contributor.authorPham, T
dc.contributor.authorKarunakaran, E
dc.contributor.authorZou, X
dc.contributor.authorBiggs, C
dc.contributor.authorWright, P
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-13T14:53:16Z
dc.date.available2012-12-13T14:53:16Z
dc.date.issued2012-09
dc.identifier.citationAn insight into iTRAQ: where do we stand now? 2012, 404 (4):1011-27 Anal Bioanal Chemen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1618-2650
dc.identifier.pmid22451173
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00216-012-5918-6
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/262496
dc.description.abstractThe iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) technique is widely employed in proteomic workflows requiring relative quantification. Here, we review the iTRAQ literature; in particular, we focus on iTRAQ usage in relation to other commonly used quantitative techniques e.g. stable isotope labelling in culture (SILAC), label-free methods and selected reaction monitoring (SRM). As a result, we identify several issues arising with respect to iTRAQ. Perhaps frustratingly, iTRAQ's attractiveness has been undermined by a number of technical and analytical limitations: it may not be truly quantitative, as the changes in abundance reported will generally be underestimated. We discuss weaknesses and strengths of iTRAQ as a methodology for relative quantification in the light of this and other technical issues. We focus on technical developments targeted at iTRAQ accuracy and precision, use of 4-plex over 8-plex reagents and application of iTRAQ to post-translational modification (PTM) workflows. We also discuss iTRAQ in relation to label-free approaches, to which iTRAQ is losing ground.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Analytical and bioanalytical chemistryen_GB
dc.titleAn insight into iTRAQ: where do we stand now?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe ChELSI Institute, Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAnalytical and Bioanalytical Chemistryen_GB
html.description.abstractThe iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) technique is widely employed in proteomic workflows requiring relative quantification. Here, we review the iTRAQ literature; in particular, we focus on iTRAQ usage in relation to other commonly used quantitative techniques e.g. stable isotope labelling in culture (SILAC), label-free methods and selected reaction monitoring (SRM). As a result, we identify several issues arising with respect to iTRAQ. Perhaps frustratingly, iTRAQ's attractiveness has been undermined by a number of technical and analytical limitations: it may not be truly quantitative, as the changes in abundance reported will generally be underestimated. We discuss weaknesses and strengths of iTRAQ as a methodology for relative quantification in the light of this and other technical issues. We focus on technical developments targeted at iTRAQ accuracy and precision, use of 4-plex over 8-plex reagents and application of iTRAQ to post-translational modification (PTM) workflows. We also discuss iTRAQ in relation to label-free approaches, to which iTRAQ is losing ground.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record