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dc.contributor.authorKochhar, Rohit
dc.contributor.authorPlumb, Andrew A
dc.contributor.authorCarrington, Bernadette M
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Mark P
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-05T18:08:50Z
dc.date.available2012-12-05T18:08:50Z
dc.date.issued2012-09
dc.identifier.citationImaging of anal carcinoma. 2012, 199 (3):W335-44 AJR Am J Roentgenolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1546-3141
dc.identifier.pmid22915424
dc.identifier.doi10.2214/AJR.11.8027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/254653
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to review the role of imaging in the management of patients with anal cancer. The relevant anatomy, imaging techniques, and interpretation of images of patients before and after therapy will be discussed. CONCLUSION: Anal carcinomas are uncommon but increasing in frequency. Radiologists must recognize typical patterns of disease at initial evaluation, posttherapy appearances, and when to suspect residual or recurrent disease to guide clinicians and achieve optimal patient outcome.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to AJR. American journal of roentgenologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnus Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshChemoradiotherapy
dc.subject.meshEndoscopy, Gastrointestinal
dc.subject.meshFluorodeoxyglucose F18
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Recurrence, Local
dc.subject.meshPositron-Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography
dc.subject.meshPrognosis
dc.subject.meshRadiopharmaceuticals
dc.titleImaging of anal carcinoma.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. rohit.kochhar@christie.nhs.uken_GB
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Roentgenologyen_GB
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to review the role of imaging in the management of patients with anal cancer. The relevant anatomy, imaging techniques, and interpretation of images of patients before and after therapy will be discussed. CONCLUSION: Anal carcinomas are uncommon but increasing in frequency. Radiologists must recognize typical patterns of disease at initial evaluation, posttherapy appearances, and when to suspect residual or recurrent disease to guide clinicians and achieve optimal patient outcome.


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