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dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Carole
dc.contributor.authorBrearley, S G
dc.contributor.authorPilling, M
dc.contributor.authorMolassiotis, A
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-09T17:02:27Z
dc.date.available2012-11-09T17:02:27Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-19
dc.identifier.citationThe impact of chemotherapy-related nausea on patients' nutritional status, psychological distress and quality of life. 2012:Support Care Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.issn1433-7339
dc.identifier.pmid22610269
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-012-1493-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/251616
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: Nausea is a troublesome and distressing symptom for patients receiving chemotherapy. While vomiting is well controlled with current antiemetics, nausea is a more difficult symptom to manage. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of nausea on nutritional status, quality of life and psychological distress. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study over two cycles of chemotherapy. Patients completed the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Antiemesis Tool, a measure of nutritional status (Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment), the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) quality of life scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the end of each chemotherapy cycle (around day 10 post-chemotherapy). RESULTS: The sample consisted of 104 patients, primarily female, receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy. While vomiting was minimal (5.2-14.6 % of the patients), high levels of nausea were observed (55.2-72.9 %), and severe nausea (>6 on a 0-10 scale) was reported by 20.5-29.2 % of the participants. Severe nausea had a borderline significant impact in relation to physical functioning (p = 0.025) and a significant impact on nutritional status (severe acute nausea, p = 0.003; severe delayed nausea, p = 0.017). Clinically meaningful changes were observed in relation to the FACT-G total score. CONCLUSION: Chemotherapy-induced nausea does have an impact on nutritional status and physical functioning and can impair anxiety and quality of life. As a key symptom associated with other symptoms, it is imperative that greater attention is given to managing treatment-related nausea through innovative non-pharmacological and nutritional interventions.
dc.languageENG
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Supportive care in cancer : official journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Canceren_GB
dc.titleThe impact of chemotherapy-related nausea on patients' nutritional status, psychological distress and quality of life.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalSupportive Care in Canceren_GB
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-22T14:22:19Z
html.description.abstractPURPOSE: Nausea is a troublesome and distressing symptom for patients receiving chemotherapy. While vomiting is well controlled with current antiemetics, nausea is a more difficult symptom to manage. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of nausea on nutritional status, quality of life and psychological distress. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study over two cycles of chemotherapy. Patients completed the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer Antiemesis Tool, a measure of nutritional status (Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment), the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) quality of life scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at the end of each chemotherapy cycle (around day 10 post-chemotherapy). RESULTS: The sample consisted of 104 patients, primarily female, receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy. While vomiting was minimal (5.2-14.6 % of the patients), high levels of nausea were observed (55.2-72.9 %), and severe nausea (>6 on a 0-10 scale) was reported by 20.5-29.2 % of the participants. Severe nausea had a borderline significant impact in relation to physical functioning (p = 0.025) and a significant impact on nutritional status (severe acute nausea, p = 0.003; severe delayed nausea, p = 0.017). Clinically meaningful changes were observed in relation to the FACT-G total score. CONCLUSION: Chemotherapy-induced nausea does have an impact on nutritional status and physical functioning and can impair anxiety and quality of life. As a key symptom associated with other symptoms, it is imperative that greater attention is given to managing treatment-related nausea through innovative non-pharmacological and nutritional interventions.


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