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dc.contributor.authorGilham, David E
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-10T10:43:42Z
dc.date.available2012-07-10T10:43:42Z
dc.date.issued2011-02
dc.identifier.citationEffective adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer in the absence of host lymphodepletion. 2011, 3 (2):177-9 Immunotherapyen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1750-7448
dc.identifier.pmid21322758
dc.identifier.doi10.2217/imt.10.115
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/232871
dc.description.abstractEvaluation of: Ly LV, Sluijter M, Versluis M et al.: Peptide vaccination after T-cell transfer causes massive clonal expansion, tumor eradication and manageable cytokine storm. Cancer Res. 70(21), 8339-46 (2010). Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) to treat cancer, autoimmunity and infectious disease holds great promise. In the cancer field, current dogma suggests that achieving a high frequency of circulating, transferred T cells is critical for therapeutic success. Achieving this high level of T-cell engraftment currently requires preconditioning of the patient. In effect, this means the eradication of the patient's own immune system, thereby creating 'space' for the adoptively transferred T cells to populate in the absence of host-cell competition. While different forms of preconditioning are employed, each carries a significant level of toxicity itself. In the paper being evaluated, Ly et al. demonstrate that the combination of ACT with vaccination using long peptides, a Toll-like receptor-7 ligand and cytokine support in the form of IL-2 can drive the expansion of adoptively transferred antigen-specific T cells in the absence of preconditioning regimens. This paper infers that reduced intensity regimens may be suitable for ACT clinical protocols.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Immunotherapyen_GB
dc.titleEffective adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer in the absence of host lymphodepletion.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClinical & Experimental Immunotherapy, Department of Medical Oncology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, The University of Machester, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK. dgilham@picr.man.ac.uken_GB
dc.identifier.journalImmunotherapyen_GB
html.description.abstractEvaluation of: Ly LV, Sluijter M, Versluis M et al.: Peptide vaccination after T-cell transfer causes massive clonal expansion, tumor eradication and manageable cytokine storm. Cancer Res. 70(21), 8339-46 (2010). Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) to treat cancer, autoimmunity and infectious disease holds great promise. In the cancer field, current dogma suggests that achieving a high frequency of circulating, transferred T cells is critical for therapeutic success. Achieving this high level of T-cell engraftment currently requires preconditioning of the patient. In effect, this means the eradication of the patient's own immune system, thereby creating 'space' for the adoptively transferred T cells to populate in the absence of host-cell competition. While different forms of preconditioning are employed, each carries a significant level of toxicity itself. In the paper being evaluated, Ly et al. demonstrate that the combination of ACT with vaccination using long peptides, a Toll-like receptor-7 ligand and cytokine support in the form of IL-2 can drive the expansion of adoptively transferred antigen-specific T cells in the absence of preconditioning regimens. This paper infers that reduced intensity regimens may be suitable for ACT clinical protocols.


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