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dc.contributor.authorWedge, D C
dc.contributor.authorAllwood, J W
dc.contributor.authorDunn, W
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, A A
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Kathryn L
dc.contributor.authorBrown, M
dc.contributor.authorPriest, Lynsey
dc.contributor.authorBlackhall, Fiona H
dc.contributor.authorWhetton, Anthony D
dc.contributor.authorDive, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorGoodacre, R
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-30T12:39:08Z
dc.date.available2012-05-30T12:39:08Z
dc.date.issued2011-09-01
dc.identifier.citationIs serum or plasma more appropriate for intersubject comparisons in metabolomic studies? An assessment in patients with small-cell lung cancer. 2011, 83 (17):6689-97 Anal Chemen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1520-6882
dc.identifier.pmid21766834
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/ac2012224
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/226736
dc.description.abstractIn clinical analyses, the most appropriate biofluid should be analyzed for optimal assay performance. For biological fluids, the most readily accessible is blood, and metabolomic analyses can be performed either on plasma or serum. To determine the optimal agent for analysis, metabolic profiles of matched human serum and plasma were assessed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (in positive and negative electrospray ionization modes). Comparison of the two metabolomes, in terms of reproducibility, discriminative ability and coverage, indicated that they offered similar analytical opportunities. An analysis of the variation between 29 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients revealed that the differences between individuals are markedly similar for the two biofluids. However, significant differences between the levels of some specific metabolites were identified, as were differences in the intersubject variability of some metabolite levels. Glycerophosphocholines, erythritol, creatinine, hexadecanoic acid, and glutamine in plasma, but not in serum, were shown to correlate with life expectancy for SCLC patients, indicating the utility of metabolomic analyses in clinical prognosis and the particular utility of plasma in relation to the clinical management of SCLC.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Analytical chemistryen_GB
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquid
dc.subject.meshCreatinine
dc.subject.meshErythritol
dc.subject.meshGas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
dc.subject.meshGlutamine
dc.subject.meshGlycerylphosphorylcholine
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshMass Spectrometry
dc.subject.meshMetabolomics
dc.subject.meshPalmitic Acid
dc.subject.meshPlasma
dc.subject.meshSerum
dc.subject.meshSmall Cell Lung Carcinoma
dc.titleIs serum or plasma more appropriate for intersubject comparisons in metabolomic studies? An assessment in patients with small-cell lung cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Chemistry, University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester, M1 7DN, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAnalytical Chemistryen_GB
html.description.abstractIn clinical analyses, the most appropriate biofluid should be analyzed for optimal assay performance. For biological fluids, the most readily accessible is blood, and metabolomic analyses can be performed either on plasma or serum. To determine the optimal agent for analysis, metabolic profiles of matched human serum and plasma were assessed by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (in positive and negative electrospray ionization modes). Comparison of the two metabolomes, in terms of reproducibility, discriminative ability and coverage, indicated that they offered similar analytical opportunities. An analysis of the variation between 29 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients revealed that the differences between individuals are markedly similar for the two biofluids. However, significant differences between the levels of some specific metabolites were identified, as were differences in the intersubject variability of some metabolite levels. Glycerophosphocholines, erythritol, creatinine, hexadecanoic acid, and glutamine in plasma, but not in serum, were shown to correlate with life expectancy for SCLC patients, indicating the utility of metabolomic analyses in clinical prognosis and the particular utility of plasma in relation to the clinical management of SCLC.


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