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dc.contributor.authorRenehan, Andrew G
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-20T13:08:49Z
dc.date.available2012-03-20T13:08:49Z
dc.date.issued2012-01
dc.identifier.citationInsulin analogues and cancer risk: the emergence of second-generation studies. 2012, 55 (1):7-9 Diabetologiaen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-0428
dc.identifier.pmid22033621
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00125-011-2352-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/216133
dc.description.abstractA number of observational studies have linked insulin glargine (A21Gly,B31Arg,B32Arg human insulin) with a putative increased cancer risk, particularly breast cancer, but many of these 'first generation' studies had study design and analysis flaws, and were inconclusive. A small number of 'second generation' studies are now emerging in which the applied pharmaco-epidemiological principles are more robust. For example, when Ruitar and colleagues (Diabetologia DOI: 10.1007/s00125-011-2312-4 ) focused specifically on breast cancer rather than all incident cancer risk, they were able to show a positive association with insulin glargine for breast cancer although there was no association with all incident cancer risk. A list of preferred qualities for pharmaco-epidemiological studies is presented.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Diabetologiaen_GB
dc.titleInsulin analogues and cancer risk: the emergence of second-generation studies.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK. arenehan@picr.man.ac.uken_GB
dc.identifier.journalDiabetologiaen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-21T12:11:20Z
html.description.abstractA number of observational studies have linked insulin glargine (A21Gly,B31Arg,B32Arg human insulin) with a putative increased cancer risk, particularly breast cancer, but many of these 'first generation' studies had study design and analysis flaws, and were inconclusive. A small number of 'second generation' studies are now emerging in which the applied pharmaco-epidemiological principles are more robust. For example, when Ruitar and colleagues (Diabetologia DOI: 10.1007/s00125-011-2312-4 ) focused specifically on breast cancer rather than all incident cancer risk, they were able to show a positive association with insulin glargine for breast cancer although there was no association with all incident cancer risk. A list of preferred qualities for pharmaco-epidemiological studies is presented.


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