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dc.contributor.authorSkinner, L G
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Diana M
dc.contributor.authorRibeiro, G
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-07T14:08:58Z
dc.date.available2011-12-07T14:08:58Z
dc.date.issued1980-12-15
dc.identifier.citationThe clinical value of multiple steroid receptor assays in breast cancer management. 1980, 46 (12 Suppl):2939-45 Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0008-543X
dc.identifier.pmid7448741
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/196276
dc.description.abstractMeasurement of cytoplasmic estrogen (REc) and progesterone (RPc) receptors in human breast tumors together with estrogen receptor activity in the residual pellet ("nuclear" REN) provides a more accurate prediction of hormonal dependence that REc alone. Of 74 patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer, 57% of those with REc+ tumors had an objective response to endocrine manipulation. Of 51 patients whose tumor was assayed for both REc and RPc activity, 9 of 12 patients with REc+ RPc+ tumors showed remission, whereas only 3 of 30 patients with REc- RPc-, 2 of 6 with REc+ RPc-, and 2 of 3 with REc- RPc+ tumors had a clinical response. In a group of 19 patients where triple assay was performed, 5 of 6 with tumors positive for all three receptors responded, whereas 9 patients with triple negative tumors all showed no remission. Fifty-nine percent of primary and 60% of metastatic tumors with REc+ activity were also shown to be RPc+. Thirteen percent of REc- tumors were RPc+. Patients with REc+ RPc+ primary tumors tended to have a longer disease-free interval than patients with RPc- tumors, irrespective of whether the tumors were REc+ or REc-. In the light of the possibility of employing receptor status of the primary tumor to predict hormonal responsiveness in subsequent recurrences, a comparison is made of receptor status measured in primary tumors and metastases.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAge Factors
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshCastration
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHormones
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Metastasis
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Estrogen
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Progesterone
dc.titleThe clinical value of multiple steroid receptor assays in breast cancer management.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClinical Research Laboratories and Department of Radiotherapy, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, Englanden
dc.identifier.journalCanceren
html.description.abstractMeasurement of cytoplasmic estrogen (REc) and progesterone (RPc) receptors in human breast tumors together with estrogen receptor activity in the residual pellet ("nuclear" REN) provides a more accurate prediction of hormonal dependence that REc alone. Of 74 patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer, 57% of those with REc+ tumors had an objective response to endocrine manipulation. Of 51 patients whose tumor was assayed for both REc and RPc activity, 9 of 12 patients with REc+ RPc+ tumors showed remission, whereas only 3 of 30 patients with REc- RPc-, 2 of 6 with REc+ RPc-, and 2 of 3 with REc- RPc+ tumors had a clinical response. In a group of 19 patients where triple assay was performed, 5 of 6 with tumors positive for all three receptors responded, whereas 9 patients with triple negative tumors all showed no remission. Fifty-nine percent of primary and 60% of metastatic tumors with REc+ activity were also shown to be RPc+. Thirteen percent of REc- tumors were RPc+. Patients with REc+ RPc+ primary tumors tended to have a longer disease-free interval than patients with RPc- tumors, irrespective of whether the tumors were REc+ or REc-. In the light of the possibility of employing receptor status of the primary tumor to predict hormonal responsiveness in subsequent recurrences, a comparison is made of receptor status measured in primary tumors and metastases.


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