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dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M
dc.contributor.authorBeardwell, Colin G
dc.contributor.authorJones, P
dc.contributor.authorPearson, D
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, I
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-13T11:44:33Z
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-13T11:44:33Z
dc.date.available2011-07-13T11:44:33Z
dc.date.available2011-07-13T11:44:33Z
dc.date.issued1977-04
dc.identifier.citationEndocrine morbidity in adults treated with cerebral irradiation for brain tumours during childhood. 1977, 84 (4):673-80 Acta Endocrinolen
dc.identifier.issn0001-5598
dc.identifier.pmid403723
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/135962
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/135961
dc.description.abstractHypothalamic-pituitary function was assessed in 20 adult subjects who were treated with cerebral irradiation for brain tumours during childhood between 8 and 32 years earlier. Nine patients showed impaired growth hormone (GH) responses to hypoglycaemia, of whom, 7 are below the third centile for standing height. All GH deficient subjects received more than 2950 rads to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis with a maximum dose of approximately 5000 rads being used in one case. Three subjects have an elevated basal serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level and 2 of these show an exaggerated TSH response to thyrotrophin releasing hormone (TRH) but no patient was clinically or biochemically hypothyroid. The rest of hypothalamic-pituitary function was essentially normal. This study shows that multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies do no develop with time when the radiation dose is below a critical level. Thus it appears that there is a gradation of radiation damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis which is dependent primarily on the dose received rather than the time interval after radiotherapy.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose
dc.subject.meshBody Height
dc.subject.meshBrain Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshFollicle Stimulating Hormone
dc.subject.meshGrowth Hormone
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshHydrocortisone
dc.subject.meshHypothalamus
dc.subject.meshLuteinizing Hormone
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMenarche
dc.subject.meshPituitary Diseases
dc.subject.meshPituitary Gland
dc.subject.meshPituitary Gland, Anterior
dc.subject.meshPituitary Hormones
dc.subject.meshProlactin
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries
dc.subject.meshTestosterone
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin
dc.subject.meshThyrotropin-Releasing Hormone
dc.subject.meshThyroxine
dc.subject.meshTime Factors
dc.subject.meshTriiodothyronine
dc.titleEndocrine morbidity in adults treated with cerebral irradiation for brain tumours during childhood.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalActa Endocrinologicaen
html.description.abstractHypothalamic-pituitary function was assessed in 20 adult subjects who were treated with cerebral irradiation for brain tumours during childhood between 8 and 32 years earlier. Nine patients showed impaired growth hormone (GH) responses to hypoglycaemia, of whom, 7 are below the third centile for standing height. All GH deficient subjects received more than 2950 rads to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis with a maximum dose of approximately 5000 rads being used in one case. Three subjects have an elevated basal serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level and 2 of these show an exaggerated TSH response to thyrotrophin releasing hormone (TRH) but no patient was clinically or biochemically hypothyroid. The rest of hypothalamic-pituitary function was essentially normal. This study shows that multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies do no develop with time when the radiation dose is below a critical level. Thus it appears that there is a gradation of radiation damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis which is dependent primarily on the dose received rather than the time interval after radiotherapy.


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