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dc.contributor.authorHendry, Jolyon H
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-03T15:53:30Z
dc.date.available2010-12-03T15:53:30Z
dc.date.issued1985-01
dc.identifier.citationSurvival curves for normal-tissue clonogens: a comparison of assessments using in vitro, transplantation, or in situ techniques. 1985, 47 (1):3-16 Int J Radiat Biol Relat Stud Phys Chem Meden
dc.identifier.issn0020-7616
dc.identifier.pmid3882586
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/117168
dc.description.abstractA survey of survival curves in the literature, for clonogenic cells (clonogens) in normal tissues, highlights the following features: the sensitivity of some human and dog clonogens apparently is greater than that of their counterparts in mice and sheep, assessed in vitro. However, this should be interpreted with caution because of the possibility of cell selection and the ability to modify sensitivity markedly in some systems by variations in growth conditions; extrapolation numbers are in general higher when assessed in vivo than in vitro. This is due partly to the lack of measurements of repair of potentially-lethal damage using many assays in vitro. This feature increases the extrapolation number when measured using transplantation assays in vivo; epithelial clonogens in vivo demonstrate a remarkable similarity in sensitivity between tissues. The range is similar for clonogens assayed in situ or by transplantation, and this argues against the possibility that a resistant subpopulation may be selected in most assays in situ. It is emphasized from the comparisons that caution must be exercised in extrapolating results, obtained for clonogens assayed in vitro or by transplantation in vivo, to the situation in situ.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshCell Survival
dc.subject.meshColony-Forming Units Assay
dc.subject.meshDogs
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiation
dc.subject.meshFibroblasts
dc.subject.meshGamma Rays
dc.subject.meshGuinea Pigs
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cells
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMice
dc.subject.meshRats
dc.subject.meshSheep
dc.subject.meshStem Cells
dc.subject.meshX-Rays
dc.titleSurvival curves for normal-tissue clonogens: a comparison of assessments using in vitro, transplantation, or in situ techniques.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRadiobiology Department, Immunology, Paterson Laboratories, Chistie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester, M20 9BX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Radiation Biology and Related Studies in Physics, Chemistry, and Medicineen
html.description.abstractA survey of survival curves in the literature, for clonogenic cells (clonogens) in normal tissues, highlights the following features: the sensitivity of some human and dog clonogens apparently is greater than that of their counterparts in mice and sheep, assessed in vitro. However, this should be interpreted with caution because of the possibility of cell selection and the ability to modify sensitivity markedly in some systems by variations in growth conditions; extrapolation numbers are in general higher when assessed in vivo than in vitro. This is due partly to the lack of measurements of repair of potentially-lethal damage using many assays in vitro. This feature increases the extrapolation number when measured using transplantation assays in vivo; epithelial clonogens in vivo demonstrate a remarkable similarity in sensitivity between tissues. The range is similar for clonogens assayed in situ or by transplantation, and this argues against the possibility that a resistant subpopulation may be selected in most assays in situ. It is emphasized from the comparisons that caution must be exercised in extrapolating results, obtained for clonogens assayed in vitro or by transplantation in vivo, to the situation in situ.


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