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dc.contributor.authorMoore, Christopher J
dc.contributor.authorEddleston, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-02T12:01:27Z
dc.date.available2010-12-02T12:01:27Z
dc.date.issued1985-04
dc.identifier.citationDiagnostic imaging, a "parallel" discipline. Can current technology provide a reliable digital diagnostic radiology department? 1985, 58 (688):309-12 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285
dc.identifier.pmid4063674
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/0007-1285-58-688-309
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/116940
dc.description.abstractOnly recently has any detailed criticism been voiced about the practicalities of the introduction of generalised, digital, imaging complexes in diagnostic radiology. Although attendant technological problems are highlighted we argue that the fundamental causes of current difficulties are not in the generation but in the processing, filing and subsequent retrieval for display of digital image records. In the real world, looking at images is a parallel process of some complexity and so it is perhaps untimely to expect versatile handling of vast image data bases by existing computer hardware and software which, by their current nature, perform tasks serially. Successes in applying new imaging devices using digital technology, numerical methods and more easily available computing power are directing radiology towards the concept of all-digital departmental complexes. Hence a critical discussion of fundamental problems should be encouraged, to promote a thorough understanding of what may be involved (Gray et al, 1984) in following such a course. It is equally important to gain some perspective about the development possibilities for existing, commercially available equipment being offered to the medical community.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshComputers
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInformation Systems
dc.subject.meshRadionuclide Imaging
dc.subject.meshTechnology, Radiologic
dc.titleDiagnostic imaging, a "parallel" discipline. Can current technology provide a reliable digital diagnostic radiology department?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchesteren
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Radiologyen
html.description.abstractOnly recently has any detailed criticism been voiced about the practicalities of the introduction of generalised, digital, imaging complexes in diagnostic radiology. Although attendant technological problems are highlighted we argue that the fundamental causes of current difficulties are not in the generation but in the processing, filing and subsequent retrieval for display of digital image records. In the real world, looking at images is a parallel process of some complexity and so it is perhaps untimely to expect versatile handling of vast image data bases by existing computer hardware and software which, by their current nature, perform tasks serially. Successes in applying new imaging devices using digital technology, numerical methods and more easily available computing power are directing radiology towards the concept of all-digital departmental complexes. Hence a critical discussion of fundamental problems should be encouraged, to promote a thorough understanding of what may be involved (Gray et al, 1984) in following such a course. It is equally important to gain some perspective about the development possibilities for existing, commercially available equipment being offered to the medical community.


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