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dc.contributor.authorJames, Roger D
dc.contributor.authorPointon, R C S
dc.contributor.authorMartin, S
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-02T11:23:41Z
dc.date.available2010-12-02T11:23:41Z
dc.date.issued1985-04
dc.identifier.citationLocal radiotherapy in the management of squamous carcinoma of the anus. 1985, 72 (4):282-5 Br J Surgen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1323
dc.identifier.pmid3986477
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/bjs.1800720411
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/116935
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes the results of treating 74 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and perianal skin using interstitial radiotherapy as primary treatment. This technique does not involve irradiation of regional lymph nodes. The local control rate for patients with tumours smaller than 5 cm and with negative inguinal nodes was significantly better than for the remaining patients (64 versus 23 per cent). Only 3 of 41 patients with tumours less than 5 cm diameter had clinically significant nodes at presentation, while in 33 patients with tumours larger than 5 cm there were 6 with involved nodes at presentation. Local treatment using interstitial radiotherapy is suggested as useful primary treatment for small, node-negative carcinomas, with surgery held in reserve for failures.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAnus Canceren
dc.subjectCancer Recurrenceen
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAnus Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshBrachytherapy
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Squamous Cell
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshGroin
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLymphatic Metastasis
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Recurrence, Local
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries
dc.titleLocal radiotherapy in the management of squamous carcinoma of the anus.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester M20 9BX UKen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Surgeryen
html.description.abstractThis paper describes the results of treating 74 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal and perianal skin using interstitial radiotherapy as primary treatment. This technique does not involve irradiation of regional lymph nodes. The local control rate for patients with tumours smaller than 5 cm and with negative inguinal nodes was significantly better than for the remaining patients (64 versus 23 per cent). Only 3 of 41 patients with tumours less than 5 cm diameter had clinically significant nodes at presentation, while in 33 patients with tumours larger than 5 cm there were 6 with involved nodes at presentation. Local treatment using interstitial radiotherapy is suggested as useful primary treatment for small, node-negative carcinomas, with surgery held in reserve for failures.


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