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dc.contributor.authorBrooks, C F
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-22T18:21:28Z
dc.date.available2010-11-22T18:21:28Z
dc.date.issued1986-07
dc.identifier.citationPresentation of a soluble bacterial antigen and cell-surface alloantigens by large granular lymphocytes (LGL) in comparison with monocytes. 1986, 58 (3):343-50 Immunologyen
dc.identifier.issn0019-2805
dc.identifier.pmid3488259
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/116003
dc.description.abstractThe ability of large granular lymphocytes (LGL) to function as antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the proliferative response to the soluble bacterial antigen streptolysin O (SLO) was investigated. Despite the fact that a subset of LGL isolated by sorting peripheral blood lymphocytes with the B73.1 monoclonal antibody on a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS-IV) expressed MHC Class II molecules of the DP, DQ and DR subregion loci, presentation of SLO by LGL was not demonstrated. Thus, T-cell populations containing LGL but carefully depleted of monocytes, isolated either by sorting using the FACS-IV or by SRBC-rosetting, were unresponsive to antigenic stimulation with SLO. Application of exogenous interleukin-1 to FACS-IV-isolated LGL-containing T-cell populations did not elicit presentation of SLO by the LGL. In vitro activation with phytohaemagglutinin and interleukin-2, which induced Class II expression in T-cell populations, resulted in an increased expression of Class II molecules of the DP, DQ and DR specificities on LGL. Although such activated T-cell and LGL populations were incapable of presenting SLO to freshly isolated antigen-non-responsive T cells, both activated populations were able to act as stimulators in an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. The ability of highly Class II-positive activated LGL to present membrane-bound antigens suggests that their inability to present a soluble antigen may be related to the absence of effective antigen sequestration and/or processing mechanisms.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAntigen-Presenting Cells
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Bacterial
dc.subject.meshBacterial Proteins
dc.subject.meshCell Separation
dc.subject.meshFlow Cytometry
dc.subject.meshHistocompatibility Antigens Class II
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-1
dc.subject.meshLymphocyte Activation
dc.subject.meshLymphocytes
dc.subject.meshMonocytes
dc.subject.meshRosette Formation
dc.subject.meshStreptolysins
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes
dc.titlePresentation of a soluble bacterial antigen and cell-surface alloantigens by large granular lymphocytes (LGL) in comparison with monocytes.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPaterson Laboratories, Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester.en
dc.identifier.journalImmunologyen
html.description.abstractThe ability of large granular lymphocytes (LGL) to function as antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the proliferative response to the soluble bacterial antigen streptolysin O (SLO) was investigated. Despite the fact that a subset of LGL isolated by sorting peripheral blood lymphocytes with the B73.1 monoclonal antibody on a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS-IV) expressed MHC Class II molecules of the DP, DQ and DR subregion loci, presentation of SLO by LGL was not demonstrated. Thus, T-cell populations containing LGL but carefully depleted of monocytes, isolated either by sorting using the FACS-IV or by SRBC-rosetting, were unresponsive to antigenic stimulation with SLO. Application of exogenous interleukin-1 to FACS-IV-isolated LGL-containing T-cell populations did not elicit presentation of SLO by the LGL. In vitro activation with phytohaemagglutinin and interleukin-2, which induced Class II expression in T-cell populations, resulted in an increased expression of Class II molecules of the DP, DQ and DR specificities on LGL. Although such activated T-cell and LGL populations were incapable of presenting SLO to freshly isolated antigen-non-responsive T cells, both activated populations were able to act as stimulators in an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. The ability of highly Class II-positive activated LGL to present membrane-bound antigens suggests that their inability to present a soluble antigen may be related to the absence of effective antigen sequestration and/or processing mechanisms.


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