Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWilliams, G
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Anthony
dc.contributor.authorJones, M
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-22T14:37:48Z
dc.date.available2010-11-22T14:37:48Z
dc.date.issued1988-11
dc.identifier.citationThe relationship of body weight to response to endocrine therapy, steroid hormone receptors and survival of patients with advanced cancer of the breast. 1988, 58 (5):631-4 Br J Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920
dc.identifier.pmid3219275
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/115971
dc.description.abstractHigh body weight is associated with increased production of oestrogens which may influence the clinical behaviour of breast cancer. We have examined the influence of body weight on the response to endocrine therapy, steroid hormone receptor content and survival in 227 women who either presented with or developed advanced cancer of the breast. One hundred and thirty-three (59%) patients presented with operable disease and 94 (41%) with locally advanced tumours. Two hundred (88%) were treated by tamoxifen and 27 (12%) by ovarian ablation. High body weight was correlated with advanced tumour stage (P = 0.002) and progesterone receptor (PR) positivity (P = 0.01), but not with the presence of oestrogen receptor (ER P = 0.21). The association between high body weight and PR positivity was particularly noticeable among ER positive tumours. There was no significant relationship between the nature of the response to therapy and weight (P = 0.57). There was no significant difference in survival from the start of endocrine therapy (P = 0.95), nor the time to progression of disease (P = 0.29) between patients above and below the median weight of 64 kg. Among the patients with operable disease, there was no difference in overall survival (P = 0.42), relapse free survival (P = 0.69), and survival from the start of endocrine therapy (P = 0.85) according to body weight.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.subjectOestrogen Receptorsen
dc.subject.meshBody Weight
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshOvariectomy
dc.subject.meshOvary
dc.subject.meshPrognosis
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Estrogen
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Progesterone
dc.subject.meshTamoxifen
dc.titleThe relationship of body weight to response to endocrine therapy, steroid hormone receptors and survival of patients with advanced cancer of the breast.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren
html.description.abstractHigh body weight is associated with increased production of oestrogens which may influence the clinical behaviour of breast cancer. We have examined the influence of body weight on the response to endocrine therapy, steroid hormone receptor content and survival in 227 women who either presented with or developed advanced cancer of the breast. One hundred and thirty-three (59%) patients presented with operable disease and 94 (41%) with locally advanced tumours. Two hundred (88%) were treated by tamoxifen and 27 (12%) by ovarian ablation. High body weight was correlated with advanced tumour stage (P = 0.002) and progesterone receptor (PR) positivity (P = 0.01), but not with the presence of oestrogen receptor (ER P = 0.21). The association between high body weight and PR positivity was particularly noticeable among ER positive tumours. There was no significant relationship between the nature of the response to therapy and weight (P = 0.57). There was no significant difference in survival from the start of endocrine therapy (P = 0.95), nor the time to progression of disease (P = 0.29) between patients above and below the median weight of 64 kg. Among the patients with operable disease, there was no difference in overall survival (P = 0.42), relapse free survival (P = 0.69), and survival from the start of endocrine therapy (P = 0.85) according to body weight.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record