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dc.contributor.authorLambert, Mark E
dc.contributor.authorChadwick, Gill A
dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Ann
dc.contributor.authorScarffe, J Howard
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-10T10:21:45Z
dc.date.available2010-11-10T10:21:45Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.citationExperience with the Portacath., 6 (1):57-63 Hematol Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn0278-0232
dc.identifier.pmid3343028
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hon.2900060109
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/115252
dc.description.abstractFifty Portacaths have been inserted in patients undergoing prolonged outpatient chemotherapy, most for haematological disease. Twenty-one are still working at a median duration of 12 months (range 1-27) and a further 15 were functioning normally at the time of the patients death (median survival 6 months). Four functioning Portacaths have been removed, three suspected of causing septicaemia and one believed erroneously to have occluded. Ten have ceased to function and nine of these have been removed. The causes of these failures are nearly all avoidable and are discussed in detail; many occurred early in our experience. With careful attention to detail and with management by trained and interested staff, the Portacath is a safe and reliable device for intermittent vascular access.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAnticancerous Agentsen
dc.subjectHaematomaen
dc.subjectAnticancerous Combined Chemotherapy Protocolsen
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
dc.subject.meshCatheterization, Central Venous
dc.subject.meshCytosine
dc.subject.meshDoxorubicin
dc.subject.meshEtoposide
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshForeign Bodies
dc.subject.meshHematoma
dc.subject.meshHerpes Zoster
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInfusions, Intravenous
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshThrombosis
dc.titleExperience with the Portacath.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, U.K.en
dc.identifier.journalHematological Oncologyen
html.description.abstractFifty Portacaths have been inserted in patients undergoing prolonged outpatient chemotherapy, most for haematological disease. Twenty-one are still working at a median duration of 12 months (range 1-27) and a further 15 were functioning normally at the time of the patients death (median survival 6 months). Four functioning Portacaths have been removed, three suspected of causing septicaemia and one believed erroneously to have occluded. Ten have ceased to function and nine of these have been removed. The causes of these failures are nearly all avoidable and are discussed in detail; many occurred early in our experience. With careful attention to detail and with management by trained and interested staff, the Portacath is a safe and reliable device for intermittent vascular access.


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